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Spotlight on Preconferences

Posted By Administration, Monday, March 4, 2019

In each Newsletter leading up to the conference, we will highlight different pre/postpostconferences (in no particular order) that have been planned for Washington, D.C.. For more information about each pre/postconference, please visit this webpage

(https://www.icahdq.org/page/2019PrePostconf).


Digital Journalism in Latin America


OFF-SITE | George Washington U, Media and Public Affairs Building; Rooms 306-308

Thursday, 23 May 2019; 8:10 - 17:00


Organizers: Pablo J. Boczkowski, Ph.D.* Professor, Northwestern U, USA. Eugenia Mitchelstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina

Contact: pjb9@northwestern.edu; emitchelstein@udesa.edu.ar


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Journalism Studies Division


This preconference aims to examine the production, distribution, and consumption of digital journalism in Latin America. The keynote speaker will be Silvio Waisbord, Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University, and ICA Fellow.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE 


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Boundary Conditions in Mobile Communication: 16th Annual ICA Mobile Preconference


OFF-SITE | Tentatively Smithsonian Museum of Natural History (Alternative: National Press Club);

Thursday, 23 May 2019; 8:30 - 17:00


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Mobile Communication Interest Group


Contact: mobilepreconf@gmail.com


For 15 years, the ICA Mobile Pre-Conference has been an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars, researchers, and practitioners who focus on mobile communication research. In recent years, the mobile pre-conference has been organized in the form of several interactive Blue Sky workshops. These provide a venue where scholars can present, learn and discuss their latest ideas, research, and skills around a limited number of themes related to mobile communication and mobile media. The pre-conference has been recently refocused to support the development of graduate students, junior scholars as well as scholars from the Global South. The pre-conference is seen as an opportunity to bring together a collection of colleagues with whom one can work out a common research vision. It is the ambition of the organizers that panels can result in, for example, writing a common paper on their theme of choice, or the publication of a special issue in a journal. The pre-conference is an opportunity for graduate students and new faculty to interact with more experienced mobile researchers to cultivate a supportive and integrated community of mobile scholars. Ideas discussed and presented at the mobile pre-conference have consistently nourished the theoretical and methodological foundations of mobile research, started joint research projects and eventually lead to publications in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to the Blue Sky workshops, the pre-conference features a conference lunch and dinner where scholars will interact in an informal and social atmosphere.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Beyond Germany: German Media Theory in a Global Context


OFF-SITE | Goethe Institute, 1990 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006

Thursday, 23 May 2019; 10:00 - 18:00


Organizers: Andreas Ströhl, Wolfgang Suetzl, Bernhard Debatin

Contact: suetzl@ohio.edu


Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Philosophy Theory and Critique Division and Intercultural Communication Division


Beyond Germany: German Media Theory in a Global Context  Pre-conference proposal for the 2019 ICA annual conference, Washington, D.C. Sponsored by the Goethe Institute, Washington, D.C., and Ohio University Just as “French Theory” became a catchphrase (and the source of controversy) in American critical theory in the 1980s, “German media theory” has come to signify a specific way of understanding and theorizing the media that draws on a rich heritage of continental literary studies and philosophy. Over the past decade, German media studies—Medienwissenschaft— has experienced a rapid growth. Currently, more than fifty media studies programs are being offered at German universities. This growth has been accompanied by reflective enquiries regarding specific methodological and philosophical identity, including the question, “what’s German about German media theory?” asked by philosopher Claus Pias in his 2015 essay. Is there a German Sonderweg, others asked, a way of studying the media that is particular to German-speaking theorists?  As part of this development, the relationship between a German approach to media studies, and approaches more common in North America and the Anglophone parts of the world, has been studied in greater detail. The history of German intellectual emigration to America from the 1930s on, in many cases forced by the Nazi persecution of Jewish and Marxist writers, stood at the outset of a complex and fecund intellectual exchange. While German-speaking émigrés such Paul Lazarsfeld and Edward Bernays had a significant impact on the evolution of American mass communication scholarship, the exiled Frankfurt School scholars, having witnessed the Nazi use of the mass media for propaganda, were developing a radical criticism of media as technologies of power: Adorno’s culture industry and Günther Anders’ criticism of television are cases in point. They were at the basis of a widespread media pessimism among Germans, who today retain a more cautious and skeptical approach to social and emerging media, as well as placing a greater importance on privacy protection.  Today, names such as media studies pioneer Friedrich Kittler, or contemporary scholars such as Siegfried Zielinski or Sybille Krämer still stand for a way of doing pursuing an approach to media studies that continues to engage with literary studies and philosophy, and considers itself distinct from mass communication studies, and more as a discursive strategy than a discipline (Pias). But the boundaries around “German” are no longer a simple matter of language and nationality. Many works of theorists writing in German and/or working in Germany are available in translation in dozens of languages, including Chinese, Portuguese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, etc., These writings have become easily accessible to scholars beyond the established transatlantic trading route of ideas. Other German-language theorists, for instance, Vilém Flusser in the 1980s and currently, Byung-Chul Han, have completely done away with of the adjective “German,” pluralizing it and making its meaning a matter of translation theory and cultural hybridity. Against this background, this conference invites international communication scholars to offer perspectives on the ways in which German-language media theories have communicated beyond the boundaries of both Germany and North America.  How is German media theory being read, adopted, and translated by scholars in other parts of the world? How is this translational context influencing whatever “Germanness” remains in German media theory? What is the significance of such theorizing in the context of transnational theory debates? What is the contribution of a German way of media studies in a critical understanding of emerging media and of current issues in social media, artificial intelligence, etc.? What kind of contributions to media ethics and policy making are emerging from such a transcultural and translational view on German media theory?


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Leaving the Ivory Tower: The Promises and Perils of Public Engagement


Washington Hilton

24 May; 13:00 - 17:00 (half-day)


Organizers: Rebekah Tromble

Contact: rktromble@gmail.com


Several years after Gamergate revealed the perils that the digital age poses for academics whose work speaks to and engages with the broader public, we now have an opportunity to look back and reflect on what we have learned. Indeed, the need for reflection and reappraisal is perhaps now more urgent than ever, as we have seen the tactics deployed against academics expand and effectively become institutionalized within the hybrid media system. However, we also want to balance our reflections about these perils with considerations of the promises that public engagement can also offer. This half-day pre-conference workshop therefore aims to bring together a diverse group of communication scholars to discuss both the potential benefits and pitfalls of stepping outside of the ivory tower. The workshop will comprise two parts: one session of paper presentations with Q&A and one broader round-table discussion of best practices. For the first session, we invite paper proposals on any topic that fits within this broad theme. We plan to organize a journal special issue or edited volume on the basis of the workshop. Possible paper topics and approaches include: - Empirical case studies of the benefits of public engagement - Empirical case studies of the perils of engagement - Empirical work examining dynamics involving race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and/or sexual orientation - Reflection essays on institutional support needs - Reflection essays on best practices for early-career scholars - International perspectives on any of these, or related, topics


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Critical Incidents in Journalism


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 13:00 - 17:00 (half-day)


Organizers: Edson C. Tandoc Jr., Nanyang Technological U, Joy Jenkins, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism Ryan J. Thomas, University of Missouri Oscar Westlund, Oslo Metropolitan U

Contact: edson@ntu.edu.sg; thomasrj@missouri.edu; joy.jenkins@politics.ox.ac.uk; oscarwestlund@gmail.com


Journalism‚ ongoing metamorphosis around the world has been marked by numerous critical incidents that have led journalists to publicly reflect on the practices and principles that dominate their profession. From the Gulf War in the 1990s, when journalists were forced to examine the implications of real-time reporting on journalistic autonomy and verification (Zelizer, 1992), to the gruesome attack on the editorial offices of the satirical French publication Charlie Hebdo in 2015 when news organizations invoked safety and solidary in determining how to cover the events (Jenkins & Tandoc, 2017a), critical incidents have provided an opportunity to examine how journalists construct the boundaries of appropriate practice and discern their public service roles in a continually changing field. Critical incidents refer to events or developments that lead journalists to reconsider ,the hows and whys of journalistic practice‚(Zelizer, 1992, p. 67). These events or developments serve as discursive opportunities for journalists to ensure the wellbeing of their interpretive community by reconsidering, rearticulating, and reinforcing their boundaries and authority. Critical incidents are important for interpretive communities such as journalism, as they force communities to reflect on their practices and values (Zelizer, 1993). Such critical incidents as the negotiation of journalistic identities, roles, and responsibilities in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the US (Parameswaran, 2006); the phone hacking scandal that rocked the UK news media in 2011 (Thomas, 2012); the entry of BuzzFeed as a legitimate journalistic organization among legacy media (Tandoc & Jenkins, 2017); and Rolling Stones magazine‚ decision to feature a photo of the Boston Marathon bomber on its cover (Jenkins & Tandoc, 2017b) have led journalistic communities around the world to reflect on the boundaries of acceptable journalistic practice. By analysing journalistic discourse during such critical incidents, we begin to understand how journalists navigate the challenges to, and the contours of, their professional practice. These events have also engaged non-journalist stakeholders, most notably audience members, who have shared their perspectives on what they perceive as appropriate approaches to journalistic practice.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE

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Bridging Borders: Public Interest Communications in the Global Context


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 8:00 - 12:00 (half-day)


Since public interest communications is an emerging, interdisciplinary field, we invite submissions for this half-day preconference to reflect on the theme of public interest communications in the global context. Submissions can address theoretical and conceptual advancements, current challenges, or any other contemporary topic that explores the societal importance and impact of public interest communications in all its various forms.


Public interest communications is distinguished by a commitment to communication that advances the human condition. Public interest communications embraces the vision of ethicists who make explicit the priority of shared human values and rights over vested interests that deliberately seek to obfuscate or have as their goal the denial of any person or group of people the fundamental human rights of dignity, freedom, equality and quality of life including health and safety.


This preconference call encourages research that advances our understanding of what public interest communications is and the role of public interest communications in our global society. We welcome a wide range of theoretical perspectives and research methodologies. Our goal is to ensure a vibrant program that includes both senior and junior scholars, expressing a wide range of opinions and who are representative of different institutional types from around the world.


Some questions, which might be addressed (but are not limited to) include:


How does public interest communications construct or breakdown boundaries?

How does public interest communications promote and improve understanding across and beyond borders?

How can public interest communications span borders in often arbitrary and political notions of boundaries of academic disciplines?

What is public interest communications and what are the key questions needing to be addressed?

What is the relationship between scholarship and practice within the realm of public interest communications?

Other topics related to understanding public interest communications and global society.


This 2019 ICA half-day preconference allows scholars to contribute to the development of the theory of public interest communications by clarifying, defining, and questioning the core concepts of this emerging field. We welcome submissions that seek to reflect on what public interest communications can contribute to organizations and global society by pushing through boundaries and encouraging dialogue and engagement.


Papers submitted for this preconference will be considered for a special issue of the Journal of Public Interest Communications, “Bridging Borders: Public Interest Communications in the Global Context”.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Organizational Communication Division Doctoral Consortium: The Practice of Studying Communication Practice


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 8:00 - 17:00


Organizers: Timothy Kuhn

Contact: tim.kuhn@colorado.edu


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Organizational Communication Division


This consortium will revolve around a simple theme: Pursuing a deeply practice-based approach to organizational communication scholarship carries significant reward and risk. Over the history of the organizational communication field, the status of its central notion--communication--has generated significant debate. Though many acknowledge that communication is best understood as a complex and dynamic process, our studies have frequently studied fairly conventional units of analysis: individuals, groups, organizations, links, messages, and the like. As the ‚practice turn‚ and the ‚ontological turn‚ gain steam among organizational communication scholars, analysts are increasingly challenged to relinquish their dependence on entities and their attributes and, instead, to re-imagine practices of working and organizing, such that our gaze remains always on communicative practice (and nowhere else). There are, of course, a wide array of approaches to studying and representing practice, but communication scholars still encounter significant challenges when they argue for the constitutive power of communicative practices. These challenges arise as we gather data and produce interpretations of those data, but they also influence numerous other scholarly practices. Specifically, they infuse our interactions with university colleagues (not to mention interviewers during the job search process), affect the accessibility of our pedagogy, and shape our stakeholder engagements in research settings. This day-long consortium will address these challenges, bringing together senior scholars who have spent the better part of their careers working through the complications involved in pursuing practice-based scholarship. They will offer advice and insights on topics including the following session themes: 1. Methodological challenges of practice-based approaches to working and organizing 2. How to help others make sense of practice-based scholarship in the job search process 3. Making engaged scholarship both practice-based and practical 4. Imagining undergraduate teaching as a sociomaterial process 5. Publishing: Explaining the relevance of communicative practice outside the field


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Taming and Nurturing the Wild Child: Government and Corporate Policies for Social Media


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 8:00 - 17:00


Registration by invite only.


Organizers: * Dr. Krishna Jayakar, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy, Penn State U, 214 James Building, Bellisario College of Communications, University Park, PA 16802. kpj1@psu.edu, 814 863 6416 Dr. Johannes Bauer, Director, Quello Center, Michigan State U Dr. Amit Schejter, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy/Penn State, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, Israel Dr. Carleen Maitland, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy, Penn State U.

Contact: kpj1@psu.edu


We invite 500-word abstracts of papers that examine both government and corporate policy responses to the concerns social media raise. Topics may include the impact of policy on free speech, democratic discourse, activism, network security, national security, surveillance, commercial speech, privacy, and transborder data flows. Papers presented will be considered for publication in the Journal of Information Policy, an open access, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, published by the Institute for Information Policy at Penn State U.

 

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North Korea and Communication


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 8:30 - 17:00


Organizers: Soomin Seo*; Seungahn Nah; Dal Yong Jin; Yong-Chan Kim

Contact: soomin.seo@temple.edu


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Journalism Studies Division, and Political Communication Division


North Korea remains an under-explored country in communication research. In recent years, however, there are signs that the regime is moving to end its decades-long isolation, from the introduction of cellular phones to fast-paced diplomacy with the US. Are these changes leading to a new era in communication about, within and around North Korea? This preconference will bring together theoretically and methodologically sound scholarship that register the shift in North Korea and examine causes, components, and civic consequences.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Communicating with Machines: Boundless Imagination


Washington Hilton


Friday, 24 May 2019; 8:30 - 16:30


Organizers: Primary Contacts: S. Austin Lee, Chapman U Co-Organizers (in an alphabetical order): Autumn Edwards, Western Michigan U Chad Edwards, Western Michigan U David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U Andrea Guzman, Northern Illinois U Steve Jones, U of Illinois ‚Chicago Seth C. Lewis, U of Oregon Patric Spence, U of Central Florida

Contact: seulee@chapman.edu; autumn.edwards@wmich.edu; chad.edwards@wmich.edu; dgunkel@niu.edu; alguzman@niu.edu


In concert with the conference theme of ‚beyond boundaries,our preconference focuses on communication between humans and digital interlocutors that has the potential to cross social, political and cultural boundaries. We invite scholars from across divisions and various epistemological and methodological backgrounds to discuss their work related to human-machine communication, encompassing Human-Computer Interaction, Human-Robot Interaction, and Human-Agent Interaction. We seek to raise awareness of and further develop HMC research and the scholarly community surrounding it.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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New Conceptualizations and Research to Inform Message Testing: Perceived Message Effectiveness and Its Alternatives


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 9:00 - 17:00


Organizers: Joseph N. Cappella; Seth Noar

Contact: Joseph.CAPPELLA@ASC.UPENN.EDU; noar@email.unc.edu


Invited and submitted papers on the topic of message testing aimed at improving its conceptualization and empirical underpinnings while moving forward to next generation measures and procedures.  Invited presenters include James Dillard, Marco Yzer, Lucy Popova, Xiaoquan Zhao, Daniel O’Keefe, Melanie Wakefield, and the organizers Cappella and Noar.


Graduate students may apply for a registration waiver through joseph.cappella@asc.upenn.edu and noar@unc.edu.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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Digital Asia: Social Change, Engagement, and Communication Beyond Boundaries


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 9:00 - 17:00


Organizers: Nojin Kwak (U of Michigan); Marko Skoric (City U of Hong Kong); Natalie Pang (National U of Singapore); Baohua Zhou (Fudan U); Tetsuro Kobayashi (City U of Hong Kong); Muneo Kaigo (U of Tsukuba); Scott Campbell (U of Michigan); Junho Choi (Yonsei U)

Contact: DigitalAsiaICA2019@umich.edu


This preconference aims to showcase innovative scholarly work examining various subjects concerning the role of social media, mobile phones, and other new communication technologies in the formation of democratic citizenship writ large—in Asia. The preference seeks studies that address relevant topics in a particular Asian county, and comparative research on Asian countries or Asian and non-Asian countries is also welcome. In particular, the preconference encourages a theory-driven analysis of the role of new media in real-world, offline civic and political action, including recent elections and civic mobilization for sustainable development in environmental, economic, and social well-being. In addition, scholars whose research concerns the overall ICA conference theme, Communication Beyond Boundaries, in an Asian-context are encouraged to submit a paper.

 

REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE

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Deep Learning for Automated Image Content Analysis


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 9:00 - 17:00


Organizers: Yair Fogel-Dror (primary contact); Andreu Casas

Contact: yair.fogel-dror@mail.huji.ac.il


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Computational Methods Interest Group


As volume and accessibility of media content have been increasing throughout recent years, computational methods for content analysis at scale have gained their popularity and proved their importance for current communication studies. Until recently, these studies limited their use of computational methods to text analysis. As a result, current innovations and developments in the field of deep learning for computer vision, or automated image content analysis, remained unfamiliar and inaccessible for most communication researchers. This preconference workshop is aimed to bridge this gap, by providing a brief theoretical background along with a hands-on experience deep learning for computer vision methods. Specifically, and in line with the common use-case in computational text analysis, the focus of the workshop would be on feature extraction and image classification.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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The Long History of Modern Surveillance: Excavating the Past, Contextualizing the Present


Washington Hilton

Friday, 24 May 2019; 9:00 - 16:30


Organizers: Josh Lauer, Nicole Maurantonio

Contact: josh.lauer@unh.edu, nmaurant@richmond.edu


Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication History Division


Surveillance is a key feature of modernity and a well-established topic of communication research. Since the 1980s communication scholars have studied a broad range of surveillance-related technologies, from databases and CCTV to biometrics and big data, highlighting their implications for the future of privacy and civil society. This research, however, has focused almost exclusively on “new” media. Such presentism is understandable given the speed and stakes of recent developments, but it has also limited our understanding of larger historical forces and global historical perspectives. In short, the study of surveillance needs a history to understand where we are, how we got here, and where we might be headed.  


This ICA Communication History Division preconference is dedicated to bringing together communication scholars from diverse research traditions and from around the world to illuminate the long history of modern surveillance. This event considers the full breadth of past surveillance practices, technologies, and regimes, in multiple geographic, national, and cultural contexts, prior to the current moment. The scope includes empirical research and comparative studies, historically-informed theory, intellectual histories of the field, and methodological reflections.


REGISTER FOR THIS PRECONFERENCE


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