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Calls for Papers

Posted By Administration, Monday, August 5, 2019

JCMR Vol. 12 No. 1, April 2020 issue: Call for Papers


We are pleased to inform you that the Journal of Communication and Media Research (JCMR) is now accepting and processing full papers for its Volume 12 Number 1 issue which will be published in April 2020. The Deadline for all full-manuscript submissions for this issue is Saturday, 19th October 2019. Consistency and regularity are our watchwords. This will be the 23rd regular issue (plus one special issue) of the journal since it started publication in 2009. See detailed submission guidelines below. 


JOURNAL OF COMMUNICATION AND MEDIA RESEARCH

ISSN 2141 – 5277

ABOUT JCMR


The Journal of Communication and Media Research is a research-based and peer-reviewed journal published twice-yearly in the months of April and October by the Association of Media and Communication Researchers of Nigeria (CAC/IT/NO 111018). The journal is addressed to the African and international academic community and it accepts articles from all scholars, irrespective of country or institution of affiliation. 


The focus of the Journal of Communication and Media Research is research, with a bias for quantitative and qualitative studies that use any or a combination of the acceptable methods of research. These include Surveys, Content Analysis, and Experiments for quantitative studies; and Observation, Interviews/Focus Groups, and Documentary Analysis for qualitative studies. 


The journal seeks to contribute to the body of knowledge in the field of communication and media studies and welcomes articles in all areas of communication and the media including, but not limited to, mass communication, mass media channels, traditional communication, organizational communication, interpersonal communication, development communication, public relations, advertising, information communication technologies, the Internet and computer-mediated communication.


ARTICLE SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

- Manuscripts should not be longer than 8000 words – notes and references inclusive, and must have an abstract of not more than 200 words and five key words. 


- The abstract should be Informative. That is, it should clearly but briefly state the following: background/rationale; problem/issues examined (including research questions); details of method(s) used (including sample and sampling technique); results/findings; conclusion; and implication(s)/relevance of the study. 


- The title and author’s biographical details (name, university/department, address, position/title, telephone, email) should be identified on the title page only. It is mandatory to supply telephone and email addresses.


- Author(s) names should be written in First name, Middle name, and Surname order (i.e. First name first, and Surname last). A brief bio of all authors, including areas of research interest) should be provided.


- Format: Font of body text should be Times New Roman Size 12. Alignment should be justified. Paragraphs should be indented with one tab (no block paragraphing). Line spacing should be 1.5 lines. 


- Authors should be consistent in spelling – either American English or British English. 


- Tables, Figures and Charts should be alluded to in the text while allusions to ‘notes’ should be indicated in superscript in the text. Notes should be presented as endnotes (i.e., at the end of the article, just before the References).


- Data should be presented and discussed with words and not with illustrations such as tables, figures and charts.


- Tables, figures and charts should be used minimally and sparingly; they should be used only to serve as further points of reference. In which case, even if such tables, figures or charts are removed, the flow of discussion will not be affected. 


- Data, including tables, figures and charts should be interpreted and discussed by the researcher to provide a unified interpretation. Once the contents of tables, figures and charts are fully discussed, there is really no need to present such table/figure/chart in the article again.


- There should be a maximum of three tables and/or figures and/or charts in a manuscript.


- Referencing should follow the APA style and all references should be listed, in strict alphabetical order, at the end of the article.


- et  al. can be used in in-text citations but not in end references. In end references, the names of all authors must be stated.


- In in-text citations, et al. must not be used at the first mention of a work. The surnames of all authors and year of publication must be stated in the first instance of a citation.


- Manuscripts must be rich in references and literature citations. Except in rare circumstances, references and literature citations should not be above 15 years. 


- Author(s) shall be responsible for securing any copyright waivers and permissions as may be needed to allow (re)publication of material in the article (text, illustrations, etc) that is the intellectual property of third parties. 


- Author(s) may be required to supply the data upon which figures are based.


- Authors should be familiar with the standard and quality of articles published in the journal so as to minimize the chances of their manuscripts being rejected. Please endeavour to visit our website to access published articles.


Submission

- Manuscripts are to be submitted by email to jcmrjournal209@gmail.com (as Word document attachment using Microsoft Office Word).


- Before submitting a manuscript, please read the guidelines carefully again and ensure that the paper conforms to them all as non-conformity may lead to outright rejection.


- All manuscripts received shall be sent to two or more assessors on a blind review format.


Plagiarism Check

- All manuscripts received shall be subjected to plagiarism check and the result must not be higher than the journal’s acceptable threshold. Any manuscript with a plagiarism check result that is higher than the acceptable threshold shall not be published even if it receives favourable assessments.


The last date for submission of full papers is Saturday, 19 October 2019.


ASSESSMENT

All papers/manuscripts submitted must go through a rigorous process of double-blind peer review. Our assessors are Professors or Readers of communication studies drawn from reputable universities in the United States of America, Canada, South Africa and Nigeria. Manuscripts are sent to them on a double-blind review format.


AVAILABILITY

The journal is available internationally on the Internet at www.jcmrweb.com and through subscription. In Nigeria, in addition to the international availability, it is also available at all leading bookshops especially at the University of Ibadan Bookshop, Ibadan, Nigeria.


OUR WATCHWORD

Consistency is our watchword. Since the journal started publication in 2009, we have consistently published and released each edition on schedule – in April and October of every year, making a total of 21 regular issues (plus one special issue) published so far. 


OUR VISION

To be the foremost, scholarly, indexed, peer-reviewed and most-read journal emanating from Africa, portraying knowledge, intellect and learning to all humankind irrespective of gender, affiliation and nationality.


OUR MISSION

To portray the intellect, knowledge and potentials of Africans to the rest of the world; and also bring similar attributes of all humans all over the world to Africa; through every responsible media of communication; in a symbiotic and mutually beneficial relationship for the advancement of scholarship and development of the human race. 


OUR MOTTO 

Taking Africa to the world, bringing the world to Africa.



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Call for papers: Complexity, hybridity, liminality: Challenges of researching contemporary promotional cultures


A European Communication Research and Education Association conference co-sponsored by the ECREA Organisational and Strategic Communication section; the Department of Media and Communications, LSE; and the Department of Media and Communication, University of Leicester.  


Date/Time: Friday 21 February 2020, 09:30-17:30 

Venue: The Silverstone Room, Department of Media and Communications, Fawcett House (7th floor), London School of Economics and Political Science, London WC2A 2AE 


We live in a time characterised by uncertainty, hybridity and complexity, when the powerful dualisms that characterised the post-Enlightenment era (nature/society, human/machine, male/female, etc.) are being problematised in a fundamental way. This conference explores how we research the promotional cultures that have become central to the liminal times in which we live. What strategies do we use to explore and attempt to understand the assemblage of technologies, texts, networks, and actors in contemporary promotion?  


The moniker ‘promotional culture’ is now well-established as a way of describing the ubiquitous presence of promotional work – whether public relations, branding, advertising or other forms - in all aspects of our lives (Davis, 2013). It is enacted by organisations working in all sectors, from politics to the arts, in non-profit and commercial environments, while individuals also adopt promotional techniques in the ways they present themselves and their lives to others.  


However, the singularity of the term ‘culture’ belies the fluid and complex worlds that promotion is built on, engages with, and perpetuates. Organisations that use promotional tools in their strategic communication can be implicated in the worst excesses of persuasion and propaganda, yet can also contribute to positive social change (Demetrious, 2013; Miller & Dinan, 2007). Communication campaigns track, survey and instrumentalise our lives through their endless appetite for data, yet ensure organisations can deliver convenience and interest precisely because they know us so well (Turow, 2006). 


Mainstream public relations and advertising tactics are used to sell us cars, face creams and holidays, but are deployed to greenwash environmental damage, whitewash corporate corruption, woke-wash social causes, and frame political opportunism as strategic thinking. Promotional culture cannot be pinned down to one form, process or purpose, so how do we account for its complex modes of production and deployment in our research questions, methods and sites?  


To talk about promotional culture is to acknowledge the deep embeddedness of promotion in quotidian life and the importance of its circulatory dynamics (Aronczyk, 2013). Just as Williams argued that culture is a ‘whole way of life’ rather than an elite set of activities (Williams, 1981), when individuals use promotional tools and tactics on their own terms, those tools are transformed from being a mechanism of elite power and repurposed to serve our own agency. Agentic power circulates through promotional work, via digital and analogue channels, and with unpredictable outcomes (Collister, 2016; Hutchins & Tindall, 2016). 


In this sense, promotional culture is a continually emergent manifestation of the struggle between agency and structure, a hybrid form of power of which the outcome is never certain. Can research adequately address the tensions and power struggles that underpin all promotional work, including inequalities within and between nations and regions, whether in the Global North and the Global South? To what extent do we incorporate a wide range of sites, voices and articulations of its effects, and where are the gaps in our current practice?  


This ECREA interim conference invites submissions that address the challenges of researching the complex, hybrid and liminal nature of promotion in a range of ways. Submissions may include (but are not limited to) the following topics: 


- Structures of promotion – platforms, suppliers, industry structures, networked movements, industry hybridity and blurred boundaries between professional territory in theory and practice; 


- Technologies of promotion – modes of production for promotional work, including digital technologies (data, AI, algorithms, bots) as well as old (but still current) techniques such as press releases, events and sponsorships, display advertising, and their effects on the development of promotional work; the power of promotional industries and the diffusion or limitation of promotional culture; 


- Agents of promotion – ‘good’ and ‘bad’ practitioners and organisations; producers and/as audiences; non-human agents and their effects on promotional campaigns, circulation, and impact;  


- Representations of promotion – practice, practitioners, organisations, industries and professional fields as good, bad, inevitable, normal, deficient, diverse, or a matter of professional pride, and their continuity and change over time. 


- Effects of promotion – from populism in politics to excessive or ethical consumption, to social and political activism and change; from racialised, gendered and classed audiences, messages and images to subaltern discourses and representations that reassert the power of the ‘other’ on a local, national and global scale;  


- Ethics of promotion – from deontological, teleological or virtue ethics, to an ethics of practice, feminist ethics, globalised ethics, or, alternatively, contractual ethics, ethics in the digital sphere, and their effects on practice;  


- Methods of promotional research – challenges of researching the digital, excavating promotional ideologies, confronting professions, engaging audiences through academic work, and the risks and realities of research that can equally promote change or speak into a vacuum.  


To submit to the conference, abstracts of 500 words should be submitted by 31 August 2019 to the conference organisers, at the following email: media.promotion2020@lse.ac.uk. Decisions on papers will be made by 30 September 2019. Full papers should be submitted by 15 January 2020, to give time for them to be circulated to conference participants.   


The Department of Media and Communications at the LSE and the Department of Media and Communication at the University of Leicester are making travel stipends available for a small number of PhD students, to support their attendance at the conference. The application process for the stipends will be publicised closer to the conference date.  


If you have any further questions please contact the conference organisers Lee Edwards (l.edwards2@lse.ac.uk) or Ian Somerville (ijas1@le.ac.uk).  


References 


Aronczyk, M. (2013). The transnational promotional class and the circulation of value(s). In M. MacAllister & E. West (Eds.), The Routledge companions to advertising and promotional culture (pp. 159-173). New York: Routledge. 


Collister, S. (2016). Algorithmic public relations: Materiality, technology and power in a post-hegemonic world. In J. L'Etang, D. McKie, N. Snow, & J. Xifra (Eds.), The Routledge handbook of public relations (pp. 360-371). London Routledge. 


Davis, A. (2013). Promotional cultures: The rise and spread of advertising, public relations, marketing and branding. Cambridge: Polity Press. 


Demetrious, K. (2013). Public relations, activism and social change: Speaking up. New York: Routledge. 


Hutchins, A., & Tindall, N. e. (2016). Public relations and participatory culture: : fandom, freedom and community engagement. Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge. 


Miller, D., & Dinan, W. (2007). A century of spin: How public relations became the cutting edge of corporate power. London: Pluto Press. 


Turow, J. (2006). Niche envy: Marketing discrimination in the digital age Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 


Williams, R. (1981). Culture. London, UK: Fontana. 



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Call for Papers Public Relations Inquiry Special Issue


Taboos in Health Communication: Stigma, Silence and Voice


Health is an important, yet challenging area of professional communication. With the expansion of social media, rise of alternative ways of treatment, civic movements and citizen’s voices entering the debate, health communication is used and misused for blatant misinformation and stigmatisation on the one hand, and debunking myths, breaking silences and enabling individuals to make healthier choices, on the other. There have been important achievements in public health and wellbeing across the globe – from containing tuberculosis, HIV/Aids and preterm birth complications, which have been amongst top global causes of death (WHO, 2018), to higher quality of food, health products and environmental standers that led to increased life expectancy of many populations worldwide. Yet a variety of illnesses, their conditions and treatments remain taboos. They are often locked in cultural norms of inappropriate communication such as stereotypes about agency of sexually transmitted diseases and in strategic designs of silence such as framing mandatory vaccination as abuse of human rights. 


Health communication is at the forefront of the struggle for improving public health. It is a rich field for interdisciplinary and critical studies with strategic communication and public relations at its core. A number of areas for further exploration open up in that regard. What influence do public communication and health campaigns have on co-shaping media discourse, public knowledge and attitudes? Who are the primary definers of what constitutes an illness and how voice and silence are distributed in the public sphere? How are voice and silence situated in broader socio-cultural and political contexts? How are the health taboos associated with stigma, power, violence, coercion, discrimination and injustice? When does silence hurt and when does it protect? 


In line with the interdisciplinary nature of the journal, we welcome a range of theoretical perspectives from a variety of disciplines, including public relations, media, communications, public health, cultural studies, anthropology, political communication, sociology, political science, law, languages, organizational studies, management, marketing, literature, philosophy and history. We would invite contributions on topics including, but not limited to: 


• Invisible health issues which result from economic conditions such as austerity, unemployment and depopulation

• Taboos about mental health, self-harm and suicide 

• Voices and silences around terminal illnesses, deadly diseases, mortality and euthanasia 

• Stigmas in gender health and wellbeing for women, men as well as minority sexual and gender identities (LGBTIQ+)

• Silences in reproductive health, including pregnancy, parenthood, childlessness, infertility, miscarriages, abortions and FGM

• Voice and silence around inequalities in right to health and access to healthcare provision

• Stereotypes about health and wellbeing of ethnic minorities 

• Information wars and myths in vaccination programmes and anti-vaccination movements (for humans and animals)

• (Not) talking about forgetting, from Alzheimer disease to other types of dementia

• Communicating and miscommunicating disability  

• Public secrets about alcoholism, drug and other forms of addiction 

• Health taboo issues in the workplace 

• Speaking on behalf of those who cannot, from oppressed and marginalised groups in society to climate change victims, animal health and extinct species

• The power of voice and the power of silence in health structures and processes 


We welcome research papers, conceptual papers as well as short essays and review papers that contribute to critical and/or new ways of thinking about theory, policy and practice in health and well-being communication, particularly in relation to taboos, voices and silences. All submissions will be blind-reviewed in line with the standard practice of the journal. 


If you have any questions regarding the special issue, please contact the editors Alenka Jelen-Sanchez (alenka.jelen@stir.ac.uk) or Roumen Dimitrov (roumen.dimitrov@upf.edu). 


Papers should be submitted by 15 November 2019 via the journal’s manuscript central submissions system. Please visit the journal website (https://journals.sagepub.com/home/pri) for full submission instructions, including information about word length, format and referencing style. Papers should adhere to the guidelines and risk being rejected if they do not. The target publication date for the special issue is Summer/Autumn 2020.


Tags:  August 2019 

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