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President & President-Elect Joint Column

Posted By Claes de Vreese (U of Amsterdam) and Mary Beth Oliver (Pennsylvania State U), Monday, October 5, 2020

What are the most rewarding, informative, and enjoyable parts of face-to-face conferences for many people? Obviously, learning about other’s research, sharing our own work, and seeing innovative and cutting-edge scholarship is central. Networking and making contacts are also crucial, particularly for young scholars and new members. But there are a host of additional “intangibles'' that also play important roles in making our conferences so gratifying. Among them are the opportunities to connect or re-connect with former colleagues to talk about our research, our teaching, our current interests, or just our lives and our personal situations. We also often enjoy “skipping out” at times to explore the locale, to visit attractions, and to sample from new restaurants. And, of course, the many new colleagues we meet and connections we make serve to make our conferences exciting by expanding our networks, giving us new ideas for scholarship, and affording potential collaborations.


Many of the intangibles that make our conferences gratifying depend on how the conference setting allows for interactions. For example, chance encounters with old friends in the hotel lobby are met with smiles and hugs. Grabbing a meal with a friend in the conference restaurant between panels allows us to catch up and to make plans for a longer visit. And, of course, the hotel bar is often a meeting place for more informal (and fun!) interactions.


With COVID-19 as a continuing crisis, it is now essential for us to consider how these intangibles may work with safety measures in place. Will local attractions be available? Will the hotel continue to provide a restaurant and bar? Will local eating establishments be open? Will any receptions or social gathering be possible? These questions come in addition to possible restrictions vis-à-vis number of people in a room (oh, the nostalgia of a crowded session standing with 10 people in the door opening), the distance between chairs, the number of people in lifts, walking routes from conference rooms,  expanded time required to disinfect rooms between sessions, possible mandatory testing and temperature checks. All of these, and probably more considerations, next to the ever present public and participant health concerns, are facing us as we plan for #ica21 in a hybrid format.


We will be completely honest with you as an ICA community. We really, really would love to meet in person, at least partially, in Denver in May. But as things look now (October 2020) we also have to seriously consider the option that the hybrid #ica21 ends up being virtual #ica21. Much of this may be out of our control, as universities impose restrictions on travel  and/or reimbursements, and many may not be able to get visas due to COVID restrictions. We will keep that fallback option very present as we continue to plan. And we will take a decision on whether to go ahead with hybrid or move to online fully as soon as we can, in the light of the many moving parts, keeping it in the forefront of our minds that the sooner we are able to make a clear determination, the better for everyone involved. 


No matter which direction we end up heading, we are in this together. No matter whether hybrid or online, we really need each other as an association and as individual scholars. No matter the format we will do our best to create a sense of belonging, a sense of community, and venues for connecting, networking and being ‘in touch’. Whether the online portion of the conference ends up being just part of a hybrid offering or 100% of the interaction, we are confident that we have selected an amazing platform for the virtual (part of the) conference. Our new platform is easily searchable down to exact phrases in presentations, can house presentations indefinitely if desired so they can be cited later, and has built-in captioning and transcription, with an opportunity for authors to make corrections. Best of all, the platform “plugs in” to ScholarOne, meaning that NO VIDEOS WILL BE LOST; you will log in to ScholarOne and upload your video directly to your accepted presentation slot, and it will automatically go right where it belongs. More on all of this later, but whether the virtual portion ends up being the entire conference or just a part of it, we guarantee that the experience will be smoother and less stressful than ICA20. This is no longer “our first rodeo”!


This is where we stand today. We hope that many of you are able to submit work by the November deadline. We see that many Interest Groups and Divisions engaged with the recommendation to also consider work in progress. For many of us, research is something that has been, at best, very sporadic since March 2020. 


We will keep updating you as we move along towards #ica21. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to reach out to us with ideas, concerns or suggestions. We are all in unchartered territory.



Tags:  October 2020 

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Student Column: Election Time and The Cultural Tradition of Online Collaboration

Posted By Myrene Magabo (UP Open University) and Lara Schreurs (KU Leuven), Friday, October 2, 2020

Drumbeat rolls! 

Election time! We are right in the middle of ICA-elections, and all SECAC members have already cast their votes for both the association-wide officers as well as the officers for the specific Division and Interest Groups they belong to, respectively. Not sure about you, but we are always very excited about the prospective candidates for the new leadership of ICA. 

For SECAC specifically, the ICA-election comes with an opportunity to get to know the new faces we will cooperate with. A new president will be elected, and regardless of whom it will be, we envision a close and fruitful collaboration with this new leader. Good leaders can inspire their people to have faith in them, but only great leaders can inspire their people to have that same faith in themselves (McCallum, 2011). We are convinced that both candidates will make great leaders who will help us grow as we perform our roles of serving all students and early career members of ICA. 

We are also very excited to meet the upcoming SECAC Co-Chair, Christine Cook, who works at the New Jersey Institute of Technology. As Christine is running uncontested for this role as the opposing candidate withdrew, she will most likely be elected as our new co-chair and begin her service at the close of the 2021 conference. Welcome, Christine! 

As everyone anticipates the would-be elected ICA President, Treasurer, and a new Board Member at Large, the excitement roars like drumbeats of hopes on the horizon. 

The Tradition for Online Collaboration Lives On

SECAC has continued to maintain its tradition of productive online collaboration, which provides all its team members the opportunities for enhancing our online collaboration skills (the need for which is increasingly apparent). Allan Jay (2014) recalls how online collaboration began to take shape in the 1960s. The vision of people working together through computer communication without them being together in one physical space had materialized and went on for decades now. Today, a massive increase in the utilization of online technology for work, collaboration, and learning was inevitable. 

Online Team Collaboration that Reaps Success

Open, honest, timely, and meaningful online communication exchanges (through email or social media collaboration tools) often deliver and result in successful projects. Dr. Sardool Singh, Chief Global Strategist of the Global Listening Center, notes that “organizational members who reply back quickly to online communication messages show a great deal of leadership. It is easier to know who deserves the recognition of collaborative efforts and leadership by how individuals pay attention to organizational actions and communications online.” Experience proves how communication immediacy, as part of open and honest communication, contribute to successful coordination and productive online collaboration. 

 

Tom Vander Ark and Emily Liebtag (2018) contend that collaboration is brought about by “…intentional design of culture, structure, and tools, and the cultivation of individual mindsets and skillsets" (pp. 1-2). The authors also emphasized the importance of "structure" that enables team members to understand “their roles and relationships,” including “organizational routines” (p. 2), which are all suggestive of the need for good communication and interactions among team members. Referencing a Google Study, the authors further added that team norms “were key to performance” (p. 2). Norms and team values can be created and maintained through the help of written working guidelines (which SECAC currently works on). 

SECAC Co-Chairs Leadership Partnership 

Distinguishing the difference between cooperation and collaboration, Charles Lines (2013) offers a two-step strategy successful collaborative partnership. This strategy applies well to the ICA-SECAC Co-Chairs shared leadership roles. The first step is to coordinate, identify resources, and the people who shall perform the specific roles or tasks of SECAC.  The second step is creating procedures and guidelines for efficient cooperative work, which again supports the need for written team guidelines or working principles. Cognizant of the increasing need for online collaboration skills. ICA – SECAC looks forward to strengthening its norms based on values of respect, openness, honesty, and mindfulness of what each of us can genuinely contribute to our association, the International Communication Association. With its strengthened norms and structure, the SECAC teamwork experience shall continue to be enriching and memorable. 


References

Allan, J. (2014). History of Collaboration Software: The Evolution & Journey Towards Web 2.0 - Financesonline.com. https://collaboration-software.financesonline.com/history-of-collaboration-software-the-evolution-journey-towards-web-2-0/

Lines, C. (2013, June 19). The 3 C's of partnership working.   http://cuttingedgepartnerships.blogspot.com/2013/06/the-3-cs-of-partnership-working-co.html

McCallum, J. (2011). Election time means taking responsibility. Column. Retrieved from https://ammsa.com/publications/saskatchewan-sage/election-time-means-taking-responsibility-column

Singh, S. (2020, August 12). Conversation with Dr. Sardool Singh, Chief Global Strategist of Global Listening Center. 

Stoner, J. L. (2016, December 29). What Is Collaboration and Where Does It Begin?:  Jesse Lyn Stoner. Retrieved from https://seapointcenter.com/what-is-collaboration/

Vander Ark, T. and Liebtag, E.  (2018, February 13).  Collaboration: Key to Successful Teams and Projects https://www.gettingsmart.com/2018/02/collaboration-key-to-successful-teams-and-projects/


Tags:  October 2020 

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Blue Sky Workshops

Posted By Katie Wolfe, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Monday, October 5, 2020

Call for Blue Sky Workshops

 

Blue Sky Workshops aim to engage participants in critical discussions of current concerns within the discipline; exploration of theories, concepts, or methods; or the collective development of new research strategies or best-practice recommendations for a particular subfield of communication. These are not didactic presentations, but rather are meant to be opportunities for dialogue. Blue Skies can also be created around issues of professional development, such as writing and submitting grant proposals, developing a social media presence, or designing effective assignments.  

 

How do I submit a proposal for a Blue Sky Workshop? 

 

Proposals for Blue Sky Workshops are not bound to ICA divisions. We will accept Blue Sky Workshops through the paper submission website (https://ica2021.abstractcentral.com/). The proposal timeline will coincide with the conference papers from 4 September - 6 November. 


Each (session) proposal should contain: 

  • a session title,  

  • the name and contact information of the proposing session chair,  

  • a brief summary of the workshop (a 75-word abstract for the conference program) as well as  

  • a longer description of the session's topic, goals, and planned schedule (up to 400 words, to be published on the ICA website).  

  • This long description should also include requirements or instructions, if there are any, for interested participants (e.g., a condition that members interested in attending must submit their own thematic statements to the session chair prior to the conference, a suggestion of what core knowledge in a field or about a method is required for productive contribution, or an invitation to bring computers for joint text production).  

 

 

Who can propose a Blue Sky Workshop? 

 

Anyone may propose a Blue Sky Workshop, and anyone may attend a Blue Sky Workshop. Those who plan to attend a workshop should work with the workshop chair to discuss their potential role and/or contribution. Organizers' names will appear in the online, printed, and app versions of the program. 

 

When are proposals due? 

 

Proposals for Blue Sky Workshops can be submitted through the paper submission website (https://ica2021.abstractcentral.com/) until 6 November 2020, 12:00 Noon ICA Office Time (EDT).

 

If you have any questions, please contact conference@icahdq.org



Tags:  October 2020 

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ICA Book Award Nominations Open!

Posted By Administration, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

ICA is now accepting book nominations towards the Outstanding Book Award and Fellows Book Award! Please make note that the nomination period for the book awards is from 3 September - 14 December. If you would like to nominate a book for either the Outstanding Book Award or Fellows Book Award for 2021, please visit our award page for the nomination links: http://www.icahdq.org/page/Awards


Please provide publisher contact information as requested on the nomination form, so that the ICA Conference team can reach out and coordinate book deliveries to the committee members. We will no longer accept book nominations sent to headquarters in Washington D.C. 


All other ICA Awards open 2 November and close 29 January. For more information on all ICA Awards, please visit: http://www.icahdq.org/page/Awards



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Attract More Applicants

Posted By Kristine Rosa, Manager of Member Services & Marketing, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

On average, online applications have increased for jobs posted on the International Communication Association Career Center. A key component of attracting niche talent to your job opportunity is understanding your audience's preferences. Did you know online applicants prefer applying to a direct email address? The International Communication Association Career Center allows you to select how you will receive applications during the posting process. You can choose to accept applications through the job board, an external applicant tracking system (ATS), or direct email.

Reach qualified professionals with core industry skills when you post on the International Communication Association. Use the "Direct Email Apply" option when posting your next job and appeal to more leading industry candidates.

Post a job today: https://careers.icahdq.org/employer/pricing/



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Welcome to the new ICA membership term!

Posted By Kristine Rosa, Manager of Member Services & Marketing, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

The International Communication Association (ICA) is pleased to welcome you to the new membership term! We hope our efforts to provide you with networking opportunities and venues to share your research have exceeded your expectations.

ICA membership is working hard to bring about great changes and additional benefits to you in the very near future. In the meantime, you can enjoy many of our current benefits which include:

Looking ahead at the upcoming 2020 – 2021 membership term

Membership: ICA student members who graduated this year and are experiencing hardship due to the impact of COVID-19, can now apply for the Early Career membership type instead of going straight into the more expensive “Regular Member” status. The Early Career Membership is a temporary 1-year membership type (which will begin 1 October 2020 and end 30 September 2021) will allow members who graduated this year, or who may not have secured a permanent position, renew at a reduced rate.

For more information, contact Kristine Rosa, Manager of Member Services & Marketing, at membership@icahdq.org.

Conference: The Theme of ICA 2021 is Engaging the Essential Work of Care: Communication, Connectedness, and Social Justice. The theme calls for our examination of how care forms the fabric of our social and interconnected lives. From the moment that we enter this world we are completely dependent on the care of others, and as we move through our lives, the care of our teachers, doctors, leaders, and artists shape us into the adults that we are today.

71st Annual ICA Conference

27 - 31 May 2021

Hybrid Conference

Thank you for being a valued ICA member and best wishes for the coming year!



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Member News

Posted By Administration, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

NEW BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT


Neurodiversity Studies: A New Critical Paradigm

https://www.routledge.com/Neurodiversity-Studies-A-New-Critical-Paradigm/Rosqvist-Chown-Stenning/p/book/9780367338312

Book Description:

Building on work in feminist studies, queer studies and critical race theory, this volume challenges the universality of propositions about human nature, by questioning the boundaries between predominant neurotypes and ‘others’, including dyslexics, autistics and ADHDers.


This is the first work of its kind to bring cutting-edge research across disciplines to the concept of neurodiversity. It offers in-depth explorations of the themes of cure/prevention/eugenics; neurodivergent wellbeing; cross-neurotype communication; neurodiversity at work; and challenging brain-bound cognition. It analyses the role of neuro-normativity in theorising agency, and a proposal for a new alliance between the Hearing Voices Movement and neurodiversity. In doing so, we contribute to a cultural imperative to redefine what it means to be human. To this end, we propose a new field of enquiry that finds ways to support the inclusion of neurodivergent perspectives in knowledge production, and which questions the theoretical and mythological assumptions that produce the idea of the neurotypical.


Working at the crossroads between sociology, critical psychology, medical humanities, critical disability studies, and critical autism studies, and sharing theoretical ground with critical race studies and critical queer studies, the proposed new field – neurodiversity studies – will be of interest to people working in all these areas.


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NEW BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT


The Palgrave Handbook of Auto/Biography

https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783030319731

 

Book Description

In a neo-liberal era concerned with discourses of responsible individualism and the ‘selfie’, there is an increased interest in personal lives and experiences. In contemporary life, the personal is understood to be political and these ideas cut across both the social sciences and humanities.

 

This handbook is specifically concerned with auto/biography, which sits within the field of narrative, complementing biographical and life history research. Some of the contributors emphasise the place of narrative in the construction of auto/biography, whilst others disrupt the perceived boundaries between the individual and the social, the self and the other. The collection has nine sections: creativity and collaboration; families and relationships; epistolary lives; geography; madness; prison lives; professional lives; ‘race’; and social justice and disability. They illustrate the inter- and multi-disciplinary nature of auto/biography as a field. Each section features an introduction from a section editor, many of whom are established researchers and/or members of the British Sociological Association (BSA) Auto/Biography study group.

The handbook provides the reader with cutting-edge research from authors at different stages in their careers, and will appeal to those with an interest in auto/biography, auto-ethnography, epistolary traditions, lived experiences, narrative analysis, the arts, education, politics, philosophy, history, personal life, reflexivity, research in practice and the sociology of the everyday.


Tags:  October 2020 

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Division and Interest Group News

Posted By Administration, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

INSTRUCTIONAL AND DEVELOPMENTAL COMMUNICATION DIVISION


Dear IDD members,


We are pleased to share with you the following CfPs from the Journal of Communication Pedagogy.


For more info, please visit https://www.csca-net.org/aws/CSCA/pt/sp/publications_journal_pedagogy


Kind regards,

Davide


Davide Girardelli

University of Gothenburg (Sweden)

IDD Chair


===

SPECIAL ISSUE: Pandemic Pedagogy: Challenges and Opportunities (Deadline October 15, 2020)


Call for Manuscripts


This special issue entitled "pandemic pedagogy" focuses on challenges and opportunities for instructional communication in myriad contexts from K-12 and college education to interpersonal and family communication contexts to healthcare, as well as business/industry and risk/crisis


Editor: Deanna D. Sellnow, University of Central Florida

Associate Editor: Renee Kaufmann, University of Kentucky

Editorial Assistant: America L. Edwards, University of Central Florida


Submission Deadline: October 15, 2020

Objectives and Scope of the Special Issue:


When the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the outbreak of COVID-19 to be a "public health emergency of international concern," this global pandemic launched a new normal for how we interact professionally and how we enact instruction. More specifically, the nature of the pandemic forced us to change how we communicate in business, industry, healthcare, interpersonal relationships, families, and classrooms as people around the world were required to work "remotely." For example, teachers found themselves redesigning lessons to be delivered online, parents/caregivers found themselves playing a primary role in homeschooling, and employers/employees found themselves developing means to communicate/instruct/assess workplace practices online cross the global marketplace.


This global pandemic exposes an exigence for transforming what effective communication pedagogy looks like across communication contexts. Thus, the goal of this special issue is to be a repository for conceptualizing the challenges for instructional communication as we embrace a new worldview. We invite reflective essays, original research studies, and best practices focused specifically on communication pedagogical challenges posed and addressed during the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as lessons learned through research toward building best communication pedagogy best practices going forward.


As always, the Journal of Communication Pedagogy (JCP) continues to be a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the Central States Communication Association. The journal publishes only the highest quality articles that extend communication theory, research, and practice in meaningful ways. We seek manuscripts that focus on instructional communication research situated in a variety of contexts such as (but not limited to) health, business/industry, religious, risk/crisis, public relations, journalism, forensics, and nonprofits both within the borders of the United States and beyond them. We are particularly interested in the use of technology (including virtual reality and artificial intelligence) in instruction. We welcome manuscripts that focus on instructional communication research within the communication discipline and beyond it (e.g., education, agriculture, social work, legal studies, engineering and S.T.E.M., pharmacy, nursing, health sciences). In sum, we seek manuscripts that examine communication pedagogy as it occurs across subfields in the communication discipline, in disciplines throughout the academy, and in contexts beyond the walls of higher education.


All manuscripts must adhere to the guidelines of the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and must not have been published elsewhere or be under review for any other publication.


The JCP will publish three types of articles: original research studies, reflective essays, and communication training/development best practices.


Original Research Studies are theory based, methodologically sound, and data-driven empirical analyses of communication pedagogy as it occurs in any context including, but not limited to traditional face-to-face or online classrooms. We welcome all methods of scholarly inquiry. The discussion section must include (a) conclusions as they extend theory and research, (b) implications that inform instructional communication practices, and (c) suggestions for future research. Manuscripts should not exceed 8500 words, including title page, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Reflective Essays are agenda-setting pieces focused on a thorny issue or problem inherent in communication pedagogy as it occurs in a particular context (e.g., health, business, risk, crisis, public relations, journalism, education). Each essay must clearly identify the thorny issue or problem and suggest means by which to address it. Reflective essays may be written in first person and should not typically exceed 3000 words, including title, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Best Practices describe best practices for training practitioners in the field to improve communication skills (e.g., listening, empathy, civil discourse, formal presentations in face-to-face and online environments, conflict management and resolution, teamwork, gender, intercultural, leadership) as applied directly to their professions. These professions may range from health (e.g., doctor-patient relational communication) to business (e.g., employer-employee communication, customer service) to education, among others. Manuscripts must be grounded in research, and include best practice tips for successful implementation based on experience/assessment. Best practice articles may be written in first person and should typically not exceed 3500 words, including title, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Submission Deadline: October 15, 2020


===


General Submissions


Volume 4 (2021)


Editor: Deanna D. Sellnow, University of Central Florida

Associate Editor: Renee Kaufmann, University of Kentucky

Editorial Assistant: America L. Edwards, University of Central Florida


Submission Deadline: October 15, 2020


The Journal of Communication Pedagogy (JCP) continues to be a peer-reviewed journal sponsored by the Central States Communication Association. The journal publishes only the highest quality articles that extend communication theory, research, and practice in meaningful ways. We seek manuscripts that focus on instructional communication research situated in a variety of contexts such as (but not limited to) health, business/industry, religious, risk/crisis, public relations, journalism, forensics, and nonprofits both within the borders of the United States and beyond them. We are particularly interested in the use of technology (including virtual reality and artificial intelligence) in instruction. We welcome manuscripts that focus on instructional communication research within the communication discipline and beyond it (e.g., education, agriculture, social work, legal studies, engineering and S.T.E.M., pharmacy, nursing, health sciences). In sum, we seek manuscripts that examine communication pedagogy as it occurs across subfields in the communication discipline, in disciplines throughout the academy, and in contexts beyond the walls of higher education.


All manuscripts must adhere to the guidelines of the most recent edition of the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association and must not have been published elsewhere or be under review for any other publication.


The JCP will publish three types of articles: original research studies, reflective essays, and communication training/development best practices.


Original Research Studies are theory based, methodologically sound, and data-driven empirical analyses of communication pedagogy as it occurs in any context including, but not limited to traditional face-to-face or online classrooms. We welcome all methods of scholarly inquiry. The discussion section must include (a) conclusions as they extend theory and research, (b) implications that inform instructional communication practices, and (c) suggestions for future research. Manuscripts should not exceed 8500 words, including title page, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Reflective Essays are agenda-setting pieces focused on a thorny issue or problem inherent in communication pedagogy as it occurs in a particular context (e.g., health, business, risk, crisis, public relations, journalism, education). Each essay must clearly identify the thorny issue or problem and suggest means by which to address it. Reflective essays may be written in first person and should not typically exceed 3000 words, including title, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Best Practices describe best practices for training practitioners in the field to improve communication skills (e.g., listening, empathy, civil discourse, formal presentations in face-to-face and online environments, conflict management and resolution, teamwork, gender, intercultural, leadership) as applied directly to their professions. These professions may range from health (e.g., doctor-patient relational communication) to business (e.g., employer-employee communication, customer service) to education, among others. Manuscripts must be grounded in research, and include best practice tips for successful implementation based on experience/assessment. Best practice articles may be written in first person and should typically not exceed 3500 words, including title, abstract, tables, notes, references, and appendices.


Submission Deadline: October 15, 2020


For more info, please visit https://www.csca-net.org/aws/CSCA/pt/sp/publications_journal_pedagogy


Tags:  October 2020 

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Calls for Papers

Posted By Administration, Friday, October 2, 2020
Updated: Thursday, October 1, 2020

Call for Chapter Proposals for an Edited Collection

Working Title: Governing Genealogies of Film Education


Editors:

Hadi Gharabaghi, Drew University

Terri Ginsberg, The American University in Cairo


Contributions are sought for an edited scholarly collection, the purpose of which is to introduce readers to a nascent, critical historiographic approach to the formal study and deployment of cinema based upon extensive archival research into the declassified governing paper trail located in government, university, and philanthropic foundation archives in the United States and other imperial locations, and of traces left behind in postcolonial and neocolonial state institutions. We invite research that dovetails investigation of production culture and the cinematic public sphere with exposure and analysis of governmental policy and bureaucratic processes. The primary objective of the volume is to shed light on the institution and institutionalization of film and, more broadly, audiovisual education as an international academic discipline, as well as of media governance through the governmentality of university and state programming at bureaucratic and aesthetic levels with complex and lasting implications for global cultures and subject positions. The volume’s secondary objective is to assess and reflect in this genealogical context on the precarious state of film studies today as an academic discipline, and hence on the crisis facing an increasingly disposable labor force of film scholars and teachers who have come of professional age at the very moment at which the serious study of cinematic and disciplinary articulations of race, colonialism, and transnationalism has achieved a certain institutional acceptance and legitimacy. We especially invite work that unearths previously unvisited collections and offers original research and theorization.


 The volume aims to excavate the margins of archival inquiry regarding the history of U.S. higher film education, revealing and applying findings not previously included in the scholarly literature—or in Foucault’s own Eurocentric works—in order to offer an immanent critique of the field, its history and discursive structuring, and the practices of cultural production in which it has concomitantly engaged—in unvarnished collaboration with U.S. and other imperial government agencies and with private philanthropic organizations working in close relationship with them. The volume will in turn offer an interdisciplinary scope that positions the genealogy of film and media research into much-needed dialogue with scholarship outside the field that historicizes post-WWII liberal education and educational institutions within the context of Cold War liberal nationalism and capitalist global citizenship. While the volume invites detailed genealogical investigation, it is framed theoretically by contemporary readings of postcolonial, decolonial, and critical race theories with and against poststructuralist theories of epistemology, Marxist theories of imperialism, and emerging theories of the archive in order to problematize prevailing ways in which the historicization of Cinema Studies has been narrativized, its central theoretical paradigms maintained, and its socio-cultural practices recognized and understood.


The proposed volume is conceived at a moment during which disciplinary interest in the history of Cinema Studies and governing investment in film has led to the publication of several scholarly books. It will therefore resonate with a range of theoretical methodologies associated with the fields of cinema and cultural studies. Furthermore, scholarly attention to the role of governments and governing entities in shaping the direction of art education domestically and through diplomatic policy has had a longer and more prolific history that sheds light on the Cold War foundations of higher film education in the U.S. and the international arena and its domestic and international functioning as a “soft diplomacy.” We are therefore interested in excavating archival traces of film diplomacy’s creation of certain labor opportunities, academic programming practices, and the growth of film scholarship. While we hope to generate a more dynamic dialogue with this evolving group of scholarship, our volume intends to address this thematic in a methodologically innovative way within contemporary film and media studies, making substantive use of archival findings to address critical and theoretical claims regarding the genealogies of Cinema Studies both domestically and internationally.


A reputable university press has already shown strong interest in this collection.

Please submit proposals, including affiliation and curriculum vitae, by October 15, 2020, to both:


Hadi Gharabaghi: hgharabaghi@drew.edu

Terri Ginsberg: terri.ginsberg@aucegypt.edu


------


The College of Media & Communication at Texas Tech University is pleased to invite graduate students at all levels to submit applications for competitive selection for the 5th International Summer School for communication and media psychology scholars. For ISS@TTU, graduate students will be paired with leading scholars of emerging media technologies where students will have the opportunity for directed feedback on their own research programs while also being part of a provocative and future-forward series of panels and thematic workshops aimed at charting future research directions. This year's keynote speakers include:

  • Social Robotics and Human-Robot Interactions, with Dr. Astrid Rosenthal von der Pütten, U Aachen, Germany

  • Video Gaming and Game Streaming, with Dr. Vivian Chen, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore

  • Progressive Embodiment and Virtual Worlds, with Dr. Sun Joo "Grace" Ahn, University of Georgia, USA

  • Media Entertainment and Technology, with Dr. Allison Eden, Michigan State University, USA -

  • Mobile Communication and Social Media, with Dr. Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig-Maximilian University Munich, Germany 

More details, including application procedures and deadlines, are available online at: https://www.depts.ttu.edu/comc/research/techiss/. Please contact Dr. Nick Bowman for more details, at nick.bowman@ttu.edu


-------



Call for Papers: Human Machine Communication Special Issue: Diffusion of Human-Machine Communication During and After the COVID-19 Pandemic


David Kim, kimcomm@louisiana.edu

 

Special Issue Editors: 

 

- Do Kyun David Kim, Ph.D (kimcomm@louisiana.edu), Richard D’Aquin / BORSF Endowed Professor at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette 

 

- Rukhsana Ahmed, Ph.D (rahmed4@albany.edu), Associate Professor and Chair of Communication Department at the University at Albany, SUNY  

 

- Gary L. Kreps, Ph.D (gkreps@gmu.edu), University Distinguished Professor at George Mason University 

 

Human-machine communication (HMC) facilitated by artificial intelligence (AI) technology will be a significant part of the New Normal already emerging during the COVID-19 pandemic. Likely, HMC will be further routinized in the post-pandemic world, altering human lifestyles, offering an alternative to face-to-face communication between humans, meeting demands for independent or remote work, necessitating teaming with communicable devices or robots, and providing context for the development of human-like friendships with AI partners. In fact, not only has HMC complemented, but it has also, at present, substantially replaced human communication in many areas of personal and professional life.  

 

This special issue focuses on strategic human-machine communication that contributes to overcoming difficulties caused by a pandemic and addressing the HMC-based New Normal based on human-machine communication during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. Particularly, we welcome studies investigating the acceleration of the diffusion of human-machine communication as a communicative solution for current and future pandemics and implementation of HMC as a new normal.

 

Based on this general theme, this special issue aims to feature diverse circumstances of HMC related to pandemics, such as human-robot interaction, virtual and augmented realities (humans “in” the machine or machine environments), cyborg/augmentics (human-machine hybridity), human-machine teaming, and automation, and to be inclusive of multiple methodological, epistemic, and disciplinary approaches. This special issue strives to advance HMC scholarship internationally by encouraging excellence in academic research. 

 

For more information or questions, please contact the Special Issue Editor Dr. David Kim at kimcomm@louisiana.edu.  


Additional information available at:

 

https://stars.library.ucf.edu/hmc/callforpapers.html

 

Deadline: December 30, 2020.

 

All manuscripts should be submitted via the journal’s online submission system (https://hmcjournal.com) with the remark, “Special Issue” in the cover letter. In the online submission system, there will be a drop-down menu under Document Type. Please choose “Special Issue Submission.” 




Tags:  October 2020 

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