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2019 Pre and Postconferences

Preconferences for ICA's 2019 Annual Conference will be held from Thursday, 23 May to Friday, 24 May 2019. And postconferences will be held on Wednesday, 29 May 2019. There are 52 different pre/postconferences. Registrations for each pre/postconference will close when standard conference registration closes on 3 May.


PRECONFERENCES


THU
23 MAY

 

Digital Journalism in Latin America

OFF-SITE | George Washington U, Media and Public Affairs Building;
GWU Media and Public Affairs Building is three blocks from the GWU-Foggy Bottom Metro Station.

23 May; 8:10 - 17:00

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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Pablo J. Boczkowski, Ph.D.* Professor, Northwestern U, USA. Eugenia Mitchelstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina

Contact: pjb9@northwestern.edu ; emitchelstein@udesa.edu.ar

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Journalism Studies Division

Description: This preconference aims to examine the production, distribution, and consumption of digital journalism in Latin America. The keynote speaker will be Silvio Waisbord, Professor of Media and Public Affairs at George Washington University, and ICA Fellow. This pre-conference would build on a special issue about “Digital Journalism in Latin America” for the journal Digital Journalism.


THU
23 MAY

 

Boundary Conditions in Mobile Communication: 16th Annual ICA Mobile Preconference

OFF-SITETentatively Smithsonian Museum of Natural History (Alternative: National Press Club);
The location is within walking distance of the Federal Triangle and the Smithsonian - National Mall Metro stations.

23 May; 8:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers/ Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Mobile Communication Interest Group

Contact: mobilepreconf@gmail.com

Description: For 15 years, the ICA Mobile Pre-Conference has been an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars, researchers, and practitioners who focus on mobile communication research. In recent years, the mobile pre-conference has been organized in the form of several interactive Blue Sky workshops. These provide a venue where scholars can present, learn and discuss their latest ideas, research and skills around a limited number of themes related to mobile communication and mobile media. There has been a refocusing of the pre-conference around supporting the development of graduate students, junior scholars as well as scholars from the Global South. The pre-conference is seen as an opportunity to bring together a collection of colleagues with whom they can work out a common research vision. A successful panel at the mobile pre-conference will be seen in, for example, writing a common paper on their theme of choice or the publication of a special issue in a journal. The pre-conference is an opportunity for graduate students and new faculty to interact with more experienced mobile researchers to cultivate a supportive and integrated community of mobile scholars. Ideas discussed and presented at the mobile pre-conference have consistently nourished the theoretical and methodological foundations of mobile research, started joint research projects and eventually lead to publications in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to the Blue Sky workshops, the pre-conference features a conference lunch and dinner where scholars will interact in an informal and social atmosphere.

 



THU
23 MAY

 

Beyond Germany: German Media Theory in a Global Context

OFF-SITEGoethe Institute, 1990 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20006

23 May; 10:00 - 18:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation. Easily accessible by Metro.

OrganizersAndreas Ströhl, Wolfgang Suetzl, Bernhard Debatin

Contactsuetzl@ohio.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Philosophy Theory and Critique Division and Intercultural Communication Division

DescriptionBeyond Germany: German Media Theory in a Global Context  Pre-conference proposal for the 2019 ICA annual conference, Washington, D.C. Sponsored by the Goethe Institute, Washington, D.C., and Ohio University Just as “French Theory” became a catchphrase (and the source of controversy) in American critical theory in the 1980s, “German media theory” has come to signify a specific way of understanding and theorizing the media that draws on a rich heritage of continental literary studies and philosophy. Over the past decade, German media studies—Medienwissenschaft— has experienced a rapid growth. Currently, more than fifty media studies programs are being offered at German universities. This growth has been accompanied by reflective enquiries regarding specific methodological and philosophical identity, including the question, “what’s German about German media theory?” asked by philosopher Claus Pias in his 2015 essay. Is there a German Sonderweg, others asked, a way of studying the media that is particular to German-speaking theorists?  As part of this development, the relationship between a German approach to media studies, and approaches more common in North America and the Anglophone parts of the world, has been studied in greater detail. The history of German intellectual emigration to America from the 1930s on, in many cases forced by the Nazi persecution of Jewish and Marxist writers, stood at the outset of a complex and fecund intellectual exchange. While German-speaking émigrés such Paul Lazarsfeld and Edward Bernays had a significant impact on the evolution of American mass communication scholarship, the exiled Frankfurt School scholars, having witnessed the Nazi use of the mass media for propaganda, were developing a radical criticism of media as technologies of power: Adorno’s culture industry and Günther Anders’ criticism of television are cases in point. They were at the basis of a widespread media pessimism among Germans, who today retain a more cautious and skeptical approach to social and emerging media, as well as placing a greater importance on privacy protection.  Today, names such as media studies pioneer Friedrich Kittler, or contemporary scholars such as Siegfried Zielinski or Sybille Krämer still stand for a way of doing pursuing an approach to media studies that continues to engage with literary studies and philosophy, and considers itself distinct from mass communication studies, and more as a discursive strategy than a discipline (Pias). But the boundaries around “German” are no longer a simple matter of language and nationality. Many works of theorists writing in German and/or working in Germany are available in translation in dozens of languages, including Chinese, Portuguese, Korean, Japanese, Russian, etc., These writings have become easily accessible to scholars beyond the established transatlantic trading route of ideas. Other German-language theorists, for instance, Vilém Flusser in the 1980s and currently, Byung-Chul Han, have completely done away with of the adjective “German,” pluralizing it and making its meaning a matter of translation theory and cultural hybridity.  Against this background, this conference invites international communication scholars to offer perspectives on the ways in which German-language media theories have communicated beyond the boundaries of both Germany and North America.  How is German media theory being read, adopted, and translated by scholars in other parts of the world? How is this translational context influencing whatever “Germanness” remains in German media theory? What is the significance of such theorizing in the context of transnational theory debates? What is the contribution of a German way of media studies in a critical understanding of emerging media and of current issues in social media, artificial intelligence, etc.? What kind of contributions to media ethics and policy making are emerging from such a transcultural and translational view on German media theory?  We invite all scholars with an interest in these and related questions to submit their contributions for this one-day pre-conference, held at the Goethe Institute, Washtington, D.C. Conference organizers: Andreas Ströhl, Goethe Institute; Wolfgang Suetzl, School of Media Arts & Studies, Ohio U, Bernhard Debatin, Scripps School of Journalism, Ohio U 


FRI
24 MAY

 

Leaving the Ivory Tower: The Promises and Perils of Public Engagement

Washington Hilton

24 May; 13:00 - 17:00 (half-day)

Call for Papers


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OrganizersRebekah Tromble

Contact: rktromble@gmail.com

DescriptionSeveral years after Gamergate revealed the perils that the digital age poses for academics whose work speaks to and engages with the broader public, we now have an opportunity to look back and reflect on what we have learned. Indeed, the need for reflection and reappraisal is perhaps now more urgent than ever, as we have seen the tactics deployed against academics expand and effectively become institutionalized within the hybrid media system. However, we also want to balance our reflections about these perils with considerations of the promises that public engagement can also offer. This half-day pre-conference workshop therefore aims to bring together a diverse group of communication scholars to discuss both the potential benefits and pitfalls of stepping outside of the ivory tower. The workshop will comprise two parts: one session of paper presentations with Q&A and one broader round-table discussion of best practices. For the first session, we invite paper proposals on any topic that fits within this broad theme. We plan to organize a journal special issue or edited volume on the basis of the workshop. Possible paper topics and approaches include: - Empirical case studies of the benefits of public engagement - Empirical case studies of the perils of engagement - Empirical work examining dynamics involving race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and/or sexual orientation - Reflection essays on institutional support needs - Reflection essays on best practices for early-career scholars - International perspectives on any of these, or related, topics


FRI
24 MAY

 

Critical Incidents in Journalism

Washington Hilton

24 May; 13:00 - 17:00 (half-day)

Call for Papers


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Organizers: Edson C. Tandoc Jr., Nanyang Technological U, Joy Jenkins, Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism Ryan J. Thomas, University of Missouri Oscar Westlund, Oslo Metropolitan U

Contactedson@ntu.edu.sg; thomasrj@missouri.edu; joy.jenkins@politics.ox.ac.uk; oscarwestlund@gmail.com

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Journalism Studies Division

Description: Journalism‚ ongoing metamorphosis around the world has been marked by numerous critical incidents that have led journalists to publicly reflect on the practices and principles that dominate their profession. From the Gulf War in the 1990s, when journalists were forced to examine the implications of real-time reporting on journalistic autonomy and verification (Zelizer, 1992), to the gruesome attack on the editorial offices of the satirical French publication Charlie Hebdo in 2015 when news organizations invoked safety and solidary in determining how to cover the events (Jenkins & Tandoc, 2017a), critical incidents have provided an opportunity to examine how journalists construct the boundaries of appropriate practice and discern their public service roles in a continually changing field. Critical incidents refer to events or developments that lead journalists to reconsider ,the hows and whys of journalistic practice‚(Zelizer, 1992, p. 67). These events or developments serve as discursive opportunities for journalists to ensure the wellbeing of their interpretive community by reconsidering, rearticulating, and reinforcing their boundaries and authority. Critical incidents are important for interpretive communities such as journalism, as they force communities to reflect on their practices and values (Zelizer, 1993). Such critical incidents as the negotiation of journalistic identities, roles, and responsibilities in the wake of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks in the US (Parameswaran, 2006); the phone hacking scandal that rocked the UK news media in 2011 (Thomas, 2012); the entry of BuzzFeed as a legitimate journalistic organization among legacy media (Tandoc & Jenkins, 2017); and Rolling Stones magazine‚ decision to feature a photo of the Boston Marathon bomber on its cover (Jenkins & Tandoc, 2017b) have led journalistic communities around the world to reflect on the boundaries of acceptable journalistic practice. By analysing journalistic discourse during such critical incidents, we begin to understand how journalists navigate the challenges to, and the contours of, their professional practice. These events have also engaged non-journalist stakeholders, most notably audience members, who have shared their perspectives on what they perceive as appropriate approaches to journalistic practice.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Bridging Borders: Public Interest Communications in the Global Context

Washington Hilton

24 May; 8:00 - 12:00 (half-day)

There will be call for papers.


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OrganizersBrigitta R. Brunner

Contactbrunnbr@auburn.edu

DescriptionSince public interest communications is an emerging, interdisciplinary field, we invite submissions for this half-day preconference to reflect on the theme of public interest communications in the global context. Submissions can address theoretical and conceptual advancements, current challenges, or any other contemporary topic that explores the societal importance and impact of public interest communications in all its various forms. We welcome a wide range of theoretical perspectives and research methodologies.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Organizational Communication Division Doctoral Consortium: The Practice of Studying Communication Practice

Washington Hilton

24 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersTimothy Kuhn

Contacttim.kuhn@colorado.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Organizational Communication Division

DescriptionThis consortium will revolve around a simple theme: Pursuing a deeply practice-based approach to organizational communication scholarship carries significant reward and risk. Over the history of the organizational communication field, the status of its central notion--communication--has generated significant debate. Though many acknowledge that communication is best understood as a complex and dynamic process, our studies have frequently studied fairly conventional units of analysis: individuals, groups, organizations, links, messages, and the like. As the ‚practice turn‚ and the ‚ontological turn‚ gain steam among organizational communication scholars, analysts are increasingly challenged to relinquish their dependence on entities and their attributes and, instead, to re-imagine practices of working and organizing, such that our gaze remains always on communicative practice (and nowhere else). There are, of course, a wide array of approaches to studying and representing practice, but communication scholars still encounter significant challenges when they argue for the constitutive power of communicative practices. These challenges arise as we gather data and produce interpretations of those data, but they also influence numerous other scholarly practices. Specifically, they infuse our interactions with university colleagues (not to mention interviewers during the job search process), affect the accessibility of our pedagogy, and shape our stakeholder engagements in research settings. This day-long consortium will address these challenges, bringing together senior scholars who have spent the better part of their careers working through the complications involved in pursuing practice-based scholarship. They will offer advice and insights on topics including the following session themes: 1. Methodological challenges of practice-based approaches to working and organizing 2. How to help others make sense of practice-based scholarship in the job search process 3. Making engaged scholarship both practice-based and practical 4. Imagining undergraduate teaching as a sociomaterial process 5. Publishing: Explaining the relevance of communicative practice outside the field


FRI
24 MAY

 

Taming and Nurturing the Wild Child: Government and Corporate Policies for Social Media

Washington Hilton

24 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Registration by invite only.

Call for Papers


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Organizers* Dr. Krishna Jayakar, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy, Penn State U, 214 James Building, Bellisario College of Communications, University Park, PA 16802. kpj1@psu.edu, 814 863 6416 Dr. Johannes Bauer, Director, Quello Center, Michigan State U Dr. Amit Schejter, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy/Penn State, Ben Gurion U of the Negev, Israel Dr. Carleen Maitland, Co-Director, Institute for Information Policy, Penn State U.

Contactkpj1@psu.edu

DescriptionWe invite 500-word abstracts of papers that examine both government and corporate policy responses to the concerns social media raise. Topics may include the impact of policy on free speech, democratic discourse, activism, network security, national security, surveillance, commercial speech, privacy, and transborder data flows. Papers presented will be considered for publication in the Journal of Information Policy, an open access, peer-reviewed, scholarly journal, published by the Institute for Information Policy at Penn State U.


FRI
24 MAY

 

North Korea and Communication

Washington Hilton

24 May; 8:30 - 17:00

Call for papers


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OrganizersSoomin Seo*; Seungahn Nah; Dal Yong Jin; Yong-Chan Kim

Contactsoomin.seo@temple.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation:  Journalism Studies Division, Political Communication Division

DescriptionNorth Korea remains an under-explored country in communication research. In recent years, however, there are signs that the regime is moving to end its decades-long isolation, from the introduction of cellular phones to fast-paced diplomacy with the US. Are these changes leading to a new era in communication about, within and around North Korea? This preconference will bring together theoretically and methodologically sound scholarship that register the shift in North Korea and examine causes, components, and civic consequences.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Communicating with Machines: Boundless Imagination

Washington Hilton

24 May; 8:30 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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OrganizersPrimary Contacts: S. Austin Lee, Chapman U Co-Organizers (in an alphabetical order): Autumn Edwards, Western Michigan U Chad Edwards, Western Michigan U David J. Gunkel, Northern Illinois U Andrea Guzman, Northern Illinois U Steve Jones, U of Illinois ‚Chicago Seth C. Lewis, U of Oregon Patric Spence, U of Central Florida

Contactseulee@chapman.edu; autumn.edwards@wmich.edu; chad.edwards@wmich.edu; dgunkel@niu.edu; alguzman@niu

DescriptionIn concert with the conference theme of ‚beyond boundaries,our preconference focuses on communication between humans and digital interlocutors that has the potential to cross social, political and cultural boundaries. We invite scholars from across divisions and various epistemological and methodological backgrounds to discuss their work related to human-machine communication, encompassing Human-Computer Interaction, Human-Robot Interaction, and Human-Agent Interaction. We seek to raise awareness of and further develop HMC research and the scholarly community surrounding it.


FRI
24 MAY

 

New Conceptualizations and Research to Inform Message Testing: Perceived Message Effectiveness and Its Alternatives 

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for papers


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OrganizersJoseph N. Cappella; Seth Noar

ContactJoseph.CAPPELLA@ASC.UPENN.EDU; noar@email.unc.edu

DescriptionInvited and submitted papers on the topic of message testing aimed at improving its conceptualization and empirical underpinnings while moving forward to next generation measures and procedures.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Digital Asia: Social Change, Engagement, and Communication Beyond Boundaries

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersNojin Kwak (U of Michigan); Marko Skoric (City U of Hong Kong); Natalie Pang (National U of Singapore); Baohua Zhou (Fudan U); Tetsuro Kobayashi (City U of Hong Kong); Muneo Kaigo (U of Tsukuba); Scott Campbell (U of Michigan); Junho Choi (Yonsei U)

ContactDigitalAsiaICA2019@umich.edu

Description

The role of new communication technologies—such as the internet, social media, and mobile phones—in political and civic engagement has generated significant interest not only from scholars, but also organizations, politicians, and ordinary citizens. While recent events in parts of the world, such as the Umbrella movement in Hong Kong and prominent roles of social media in elections, help recognize the potential of new communication media as an agent contributing to macro-level political changes, these new communication tools are also actively utilized in more traditional political processes, such as electoral campaigns. Also important is everyday use of new communication technologies, which provides individuals with an opportunity to encounter public affairs news and discourse, enhance understanding of issues, and get involved in civic and political opportunities. One of critical elements that we should pay attention to when appreciating the role of new media—perhaps underlying all of these processes and practices—would be values, traditions, and history that define each Asian country and the region.

This preconference aims to showcase innovative scholarly work examining various subjects concerning the role of social media, mobile phones, and other new communication technologies in the formation of democratic citizenship writ large—in Asia. The preference seeks studies that address relevant topics in a particular Asian county, and comparative research on Asian countries or Asian and non-Asian countries is also welcome. In particular, the preconference encourages a theory-driven analysis of the role of new media in real-world, offline civic and political action, including recent elections and civic mobilization for sustainable development in environmental, economic, and social well-being. In addition, scholars whose research concerns the overall ICA conference theme, Communication Beyond Boundaries, in an Asian-context are encouraged to submit a paper.  


FRI
24 MAY

 

Deep Learning for Automated Image Content Analysis

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

There is no call for paper.


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OrganizersYair Fogel-Dror (primary contact); Andreu Casas

Contactyair.fogel-dror@mail.huji.ac.il

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Computational Methods Interest Group

DescriptionAs volume and accessibility of media content have been increasing throughout recent years, computational methods for content analysis at scale have gained their popularity and proved their importance for current communication studies. Until recently, these studies limited their use of computational methods to text analysis. As a result, current innovations and developments in the field of deep learning for computer vision, or automated image content analysis, remained unfamiliar and inaccessible for most communication researchers. This preconference workshop is aimed to bridge this gap, by providing a brief theoretical background along with a hands-on experience deep learning for computer vision methods. Specifically, and in line with the common use-case in computational text analysis, the focus of the workshop would be on feature extraction and image classification.


FRI
24 MAY

 

The Long History of Modern Surveillance: Excavating the Past, Contextualizing the Present

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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OrganizersJosh Lauer, Nicole Maurantonio

Contactjosh.lauer@unh.edu, nmaurant@richmond.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication History Division

Description: Surveillance is a key feature of modernity and a well-established topic of communication research. Since the 1980s communication scholars have studied a broad range of surveillance-related technologies, from databases and CCTV to biometrics and big data, highlighting their implications for the future of privacy and civil society. This research, however, has focused almost exclusively on “new” media. Such presentism is understandable given the speed and stakes of recent developments, but it has also limited our understanding of larger historical forces and global historical perspectives. In short, the study of surveillance needs a history to understand where we are, how we got here, and where we might be headed.
This ICA Communication History Division preconference is dedicated to bringing together communication scholars from diverse research traditions and from around the world to illuminate the long history of modern surveillance. This event considers the full breadth of past surveillance practices, technologies, and regimes, in multiple geographic, national, and cultural contexts, prior to the current moment. The scope includes empirical research and comparative studies, historically-informed theory, intellectual histories of the field, and methodological reflections.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Are We Moving Towards Convergence? Revisiting Communication Disciplines, Theories and Concepts

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersAnne Ellerup Nielsen, Birte Asmuß, Christa Thomsen, Finn Frandsen, Winni Johansen, Cynthia Stohl, and Maureen Taylor

Contactwj@asb.dk; aen@mgmt.au.dk

Description:Are We Moving Towards Convergence? Revisiting communication disciplines, theories and concepts.Organizers: Anne Ellerup Nielsen, Birte Asmuß, Christa Thomsen, Finn Frandsen, Winni Johansen, Cynthia Stohl, and Maureen Taylor

Within the last two decades, communication scholars have been preoccupied with debating the intellectual boundaries between disciplines, theories and concepts, as well as the institutional legitimacy of the field as such. Some researchers have talked about ‘convergence’ (Zorn, 2002). Other researchers have talked about ‘bridging’ (Cornelissen & Christensen, 2011). Others again take a fresh approach promoting a new ‘interdisciplinary paradigm’; see International Journal of Strategic Communication, 12(4), 2018). The new thing about this debate is that it seems to take place both inside each discipline, but also across disciplines.The purpose of this pre-conference is not only to study this debate, but also to contribute to it. We therefore invite junior and senior scholars representing one or more of the following disciplines - organizational communication, public relations, business communication, corporate communication, and strategic communication – to submit an abstract. Questions addressed are among others:• Has the field of communication studies failed to define itself, its intellectual focus, in a coherent way as Durham Peters claimed in 1986 (and reformulated in 2008)?• Do we overstate the differences between disciplines, theories and concepts in our research?• Which boundaries or cross-overs do we see in communication disciplines today?• Would it be fruitful to overcome such disciplinary fragmentation?• How do we ‘bridge’ for example corporate and organizational communication, or public relations and corporate communication? • What can more ‘local’ debates, such as the debate about communication vs action, reputation vs relationship, and publics vs stakeholders, tell us about the development of our field?• How does convergence in communication disciplines contribute to shape how contemporary organizations come to see, manage, and evaluate their communication activities?• Can convergence help to solve one of the major concerns of modern organizations, i.e. that without coherence, integration, and consistency, messages can be misunderstood, and their audiences get conflicting or inconsistent meanings which, in the end, may cause confusion and distrust in what the organization offers or stands for? 













FRI
24 MAY

 

Mediated Recognition: Identity, Justice, and Activism

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersOlivier Driessens , Torgeir Uberg Naerland, Anne Kaun, Guobin Yang

Contact * torgeir.narland@infomedia.uib.no ; olivier@hum.ku.dk

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Philosophy, Theory and Critique Division and Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group

DescriptionRecognition plays a crucial role in cross-boundary identity formation of individuals and groups and it is a central feature in social struggles. What social theories of recognition overlook though is the role of media, technology and communication. Therefore, this pre-conference aims to (1) update social theories of recognition by acknowledging its mediated and datafied nature and (2) to advance post-disciplinary debates on identity formation and (mis)representation, metricised and datafied recognition, and questions of social justice.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Crafting Theory. Methods of Theory Building in Communication

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersBenjamin Kraemer*, Felix Frey

Contactbenjamin.kraemer@ifkw.lmu.de; ffrey@uni-leipzig.de

DescriptionThe state of theory building in communication has been the object of lamentation, disappointment, caricature, even ridicule, but also appeals and aspiration throughout the history of our field. Rather than restating deficiencies in our field’s theory building in comparison with our neighboring disciplines or reiterating the reasons for or consequences of these deficits time and again, this preconference aims at collecting and advancing our field’s methodological tools and practices for theory building. 
“Theory building” or “theory development” can be characterized as a creative problem solving process of generating novel or modifying existing conceptual structures (statements about concepts and their relations) with the aim of describing and explaining phenomena better than before (Hagen, Frey, & Koch, 2015; Weick 1989). This preconference is interested in a methodological discussion of cognitive operations, individual and social practices, and empirical approaches researchers use in this process of theory building.
In stark contrast to the great importance theory building is attributed by the scientific community in general and in our field, the collection, development and dissemination of methodological knowledge about how to develop both original and well-crafted theory only forms small part of our methodological research and teaching. For example, there is a scarcity of textbooks that cover more than the formal requirements and logical principles of “theory construction” (Blalock, 1969; Dubin, 1969; Freese, 1980) and accommodate the specifics of our field (but see, as one prime exception, Shoemaker, Tankard & Lasorsa, 2004). Also, inspiring and instructive collections of individual experiences with and approaches to theory building have been published, e.g., in psychology (Kruglanski & Higgins, 2004), human resource development (Turnbull, 2002) and management (van de Ven, 1989), but not in communication. 


FRI
24 MAY

 

Global Populism: Its Roots in Media and Religion

Washington Hilton

24 May; 10:00 - 18:00

This call for papers has closed.

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OrganizersStewart M. Hoover, Johanna Sumiala, Heidi Campbell

Contacthoover@colorado.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Global Communication and Social Change Division, Philosophy, Theory and Critique Division, and Popular Communication Division

DescriptionThe “new era” of politics in the North Atlantic West that has followed the Brexit vote in Britain, the Trump election in the U.S., and political upheavals elsewhere in Europe and Asia challenges settled ideas about media, politics, and culture. Emergent populist movements on the right and the left increasingly use symbols and tropes drawing on remembered, repressed, contested, implicit and explicit valences of “the religious.” The persistent power of religion to mobilize new populism confounds expectations that religion would fade in significance as we moved further into the new century. Among the most vexing—and least understood—questions are those surrounding the role of religion in these developments and how media and systems of mediation—particularly digital mediation—make religion’s new participation possible. Religion has persisted, grown in influence, and moved well outside our received categories of analysis; it is expressed in a variety of registers and contexts that defy traditional framings. This is nowhere more critical than in the ways religious symbols, interests and claims are deployed in the evolving new populist politics worldwide. Scholars of media have a special interest and expertise in addressing phenomena such as this, yet the field often struggles to incorporate serious scholarship of religion into its work. This Post-conference is intended to begin a conversation about this lacuna even as it addresses its overall interest in media, religion, and politics.This post-conference will feature a morning expert panel including John Jackson of the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania, Robert Jones of the Public Religion Research Institute, and a to-be-determined expert on these developments in European and non-Western contexts. The afternoon will be devoted to two panels made up of submitted proposals and papers and a final, wrap-up round table discussion.

Relevant papers and proposals will be welcomed particularly as they might address the overall themes of the rise of this new politics, the role of religion and of media in it, and the challenges these developments, and the problem of religion in general, pose to media scholarship. 


FRI
24 MAY

 

Organizing Resistance Beyond the Boundaries of Neoliberal Capitalism

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersJoëlle Cruz, Sophie Del Fa, Consuelo Vásquez

Contactvasquez.consuelo@uqam.ca; del_fa.sophie@uqam.ca; Joelle.Cruz@Colorado.EDU

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Organizational Communication Division 

DescriptionThis preconference aims at exploring how resistance displaces the boundaries established by neoliberalism, by focusing on how resistance is being (re)organized? We will share studies and practices of resistance to reveal the communicative dynamics that expand and/or disrupt the boundaries of neoliberal normativity. The following questions could be addressed: which practises/discourses shape resistance and with what effects? How do alternative modes of organizing redefine boundaries of neoliberalism? What can communication do to reorganize resistance?


FRI
24 MAY

 

A Media Welfare State? The Relevance of Welfare State Perspectives on Media Transformation and Regulation

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 16:30


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OrganizersTrine Syvertsen, Professor, U of Oslo * Gunn Enli, Professor, U of Oslo both: Department of Media and Communication, P.O. Box 1093, 0317 Blindern, Oslo, Norway Aske Kammer, Assistant professor, IT U of Copenhagen IT U of Copenhagen Rued Langgaards Vej 7 DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark

Contacttrine.syvertsen@media.uio.no *, gunn.enli@media.uio.no, aska@itu.dk

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication Law and Policy Division and Political Communication Division 

DescriptionThis ICA preconference discusses the relevance of a welfare-state perspective in media transformation and regulation. The concept of the media welfare state (Syvertsen, Enli, Moe, Mjøs 2014) has been used to describe and discuss media structures and developments in the Nordic countries, but may have a wider relevance for the research community as well as for policy-makers in other national and media-systemic contexts. This preconference brings together scholars from different countries and media systems to explore implications and discuss media developments in a welfare-state perspective as well as engaging participants in a dialogue concerning transformations and contradictions.Type of issues to be discussed include:- Historical trajectories: To what degree is a media welfare state relevant as a historical description of Western media systems in different phases? - Current disruptions: To what degree is a welfare state perspective relevant in analyses of today's media disruptions, and which elements of a media system are most relevant in this context? - Concepts, theories, approaches: To what degree are conceptual formations of this kind fruitful for the development of media studies in general, and specifically in the comparative tradition evolving from Hallin and Mancini (2004).-Policy and regulation: How are welfare state perspectives in mass media and social, networked media understood and conceptualized within various approaches? - Industry, economy, ownership: What characterizes welfare state provisions in media industry? Are they sustainable? - Disappointment, distrust, opposition, withdrawal, fragmentation, populism: How have missed opportunities and disappointment with the implications of the welfare state impacted on media structure, institutions, and policies? The preconference will be organized as a series of panels of highly qualified academics addressing crucial issues in media and welfare state developments. Confirmed list of speakers include (in alphabetical order): Benson, Rodney (New York U, US)Enli, Gunn (U of Oslo, Norway)Flensburg, Sofie (U of Copenhagen)Freedman, Des (Goldsmiths U, UK)Ganter, Sarah Anne (Simon Fraser U, Vancouver, Canada) Kammer, Aske (IT U Copenhagen, Denmark) Karppinen, Kari (U of Helsinki, Finland)McKelvey, Fenwick (Concordia U, Canada)Micova, Sally Broughton (U of East Anglia, UK)Mjøs, Ole (U of Bergen, Norway)Moe, Hallvard, (U of Bergen, Norway)Pickard, Victor (Annenberg School for Communication, USA)Puppis, Manuel (U of Fribourg, Switzerland)Schweizer, Corinne (U of Zürich, Switzerland) Syvertsen, Trine (U of Oslo, Norway)Tambini, Damian (London School of Economics, UK) 

























FRI
24 MAY

 

Expanding Computational Communication: Towards a Pipeline for Graduate Students and Early Career Scholars

OFF-SITE | American U

24 May; 8:30 - 16:30

There will be a call for papers.


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OrganizersJosephine Lukito, Nate TeBlunthuis, Frederic Hopp

Contactfhopp@ucsb.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Computational Methods Interest Group

DescriptionComputational methods for addressing problems relevant to communication science are becoming increasingly popular and sought after in top-tier communication journals and the academic job market. Yet, graduate students and early career researchers in communication who aim to employ computational methods frequently face a unique challenge: adopting a strong (theoretical) background in communication scholarship while simultaneously developing the methodological skills required for conducting state-of-the-art computational social science. In order to acquire the technical know-how for employing computational tools, graduate students and early career scholars within communication often have to rely on self-teaching and online courses or participate in classes outside their home department that are often not tailored towards communication scholarship. With these challenges in mind, this preconference receives and discusses various perspectives for expanding the opportunities of graduate and early career scholars to become familiar with computational communication science. We invite experienced computational communication scholars from diverse backgrounds to share their origin stories and discuss commonly faced challenges, provide a roadmap for addressing numerous communication phenomena from a computational perspective[f], review and discuss ongoing attempts to develop in-house training programs, and create ample opportunities to network in interactive breakout and escalator sessions.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Design, Implementation and Evaluation of Integrated Social & Behavior Change Communication Programs in Low & Middle Income Countries: A Hands-on Implementation Science Skills Building Workshop

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

There will be a call for papers.


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OrganizersDouglas Storey, Sanjanthi Velu--Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs, Bloomberg School of Public Health

Contactdstorey@jhu.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Health Communication Division 

DescriptionIn recent years, population-based social and behavior change communication (SBCC) programs in low- and middle-income countries‚ especially for health improvement‚ have shifted away from a single topic, vertical focus to more integrated initiatives that encompass multiple health or development topics within a single program. As if the challenges of vertical program design and evaluation were not hard enough, integrated programs pose additional challenges of developing appropriate conceptual frameworks and deploying sophisticated research and evaluation designs to model outcomes, monitor implementation, measure change and draw causal inferences. This workshop will build participants' understanding of and appreciation for the complexity of integrated social and behavior change communication (SBCC) programs, and provide opportunities for hands-on skills-building in the strategic and creative design and evaluation of effective integrated programs. The workshop will be presented in two complementary parts: The morning session will focus on conceptualization and strategic design involving different approaches to integration that have used life stages, gateway behaviors, behavioral attributes, co-occurring behaviors, phased implementation, and umbrella branding. Approaches will be illustrated with examples and case studies. The afternoon session will focus on research methods for monitoring and evaluation of integrated programs, including discussion of the unique challenges of measuring the outputs and outcomes of multiple, interrelated components of a program, testing separate and cumulative impact of multiple intervention activities, testing theories, improving causal inference and building a causal narrative from multiple sources of data. Both sessions will feature hands-on exercises in the design of and research on integrated SBCC programs for health through the introduction and analysis of case studies and the use of planning and research tools for program design and research that have been pioneered and used in over a dozen countries by the Johns Hopkins Center for Communication Programs in the past decade.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Difficult Conversations in Healthcare

Washington Hilton

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersBruce Lambert, Kimberly Pusateri, Courtney Scherr & Nathan Walter

Contactbruce.lambert@northwestern.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Health Communication Division 

DescriptionHealthcare is replete with difficult conversations. The difficulty arises from multiple factors, including taboo topics (e.g., addiction, death and dying, and sexually transmitted infections), complexity and uncertainty of the underlying information (e.g., genetic testing, drug information, probabilistic risks and benefits), sensory and cognitive deficits (e.g., blindness, deafness, dementia, and low literacy), as well as competing ideologies and value-laden beliefs (e.g., vaccine safety, medical abortion, and end-of-life decisions). From provider-patient communication and health literacy to risk communication and health campaigns, difficult conversations are at the heart of health communication research. Despite its cross-disciplinary appeal, however, difficult conversations remain a much-touted but under-theorized aspect of health communication. A major factor contributing to the limited knowledge is that researchers in different fields have investigated difficult conversations in relative isolation, without the benefit of an overarching framework. It is therefore crucial to clearly define difficult conversations, seeking new empirical and theoretical insights that advance our collective understanding of the barriers that obstruct the achievement of better interactions in healthcare. Ultimately, a clearer understanding of the common mechanisms that underlie difficult conversations can help mitigate health disparities for individuals and populations, as well as provide higher quality and more affordable healthcare. Submissions may focus on, but are not limited to, addressing the following issues: ‚ Analyses of specific types of difficult conversations in healthcare ‚Theoretical frameworks for analyzing difficult conversations ‚ Provider or patient-centered interventions ‚ Technologies for facilitating difficult conversations ‚ Pedagogy around difficult conversations ‚ Methods for studying difficult conversations A separate call for proposals will be widely circulated after the pre-conference is approved.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Environmental Communication Division Graduate Student Preconference

OFF-SITE | George Mason University - Arlington Campus

24 May; 9:00 - 12:00 (half-day)

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersAdina T. Abeles, Adam M. Rainear, Jonathon P. Schuldt

Contactjps56@cornell.edu

Description: The Environmental Communication Division Graduate Student Pre-conference will bring together students working in environmental communication and similar fields with experienced scholars. We invite graduate students, post-docs and other researchers who work in topics related to the environment, science, natural resources, and sustainability to submit their work. The pre-conference will build on a successful first meeting held at 2018 at ICA Prague. The pre-conference will be hosted by the Center for Climate Change Communication at George Mason U.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Activist/Engaged Scholars: Engaging Issues in Scholarly Career Development

OFF-SITE | American U 

24 May; 9:00 - 14:00 (half-day)

There will not be a call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersPeter Lemish

Contactplemish@gmail.com

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Activism, Communication, & Social Justice; with divisional co-sponsors: Feminist Scholarship; Global Communication & Social Change; Philosophy, Theory, & Critique

DescriptionThis interactive, working preconference seeks participants interested in discussing how to adapt policies and develop systems to support: (1) young activist/engaged scholars, from initial hiring through successful completion of initial promotion; (2) senior faculty mentoring young colleagues, and serving on hiring, promotion and tenure committees; (3) administrators interested in advancements in adapting activist-friendly HPT policies and support systems.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Engaged Journalism: Bridging Research and Practice

OFF-SITE | Arizona State U Barbara Barrett and Sandra Day O'Connor Washington Center. The Barrett & O'Connor Washington Center is metro accessible.

24 May; 12:00 - 16:30 (half-day)

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersAndrea Wenzel, Jacob L. Nelson

Contactandrea.wenzel@temple.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s):  Journalism Studies Division and Media Industry Studies Interest Group

DescriptionAs journalists across the globe continue to face distrustful audiences and uncertain economics, many have begun experimenting with novel forms of news production and community engagement with the hope of solving the news industry‚ ails. Although many scholars research these innovations, few have found ways to make that research impactful outside of the academic community. This pre-conference bridges this divide, by bringing together journalism innovators, funders, and researchers to share new findings and discuss best practices for collaborations. In addition to sharing scholarly work, we will hear from practitioners about their experiences with organizations working in the U.S. and internationally, such as City Bureau, Hearken, Outlier Media, and the News Integrity Initiative. The pre-conference will be structured to include opportunities for small group interaction between researchers and journalists, presentations of new papers, and a plenary panel discussion connecting leading journalism innovators with journalism and communication scholars.

This conference is sponsored by The Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia U, Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State U, Klein College of Media and Communication at Temple U, Agora Journalism Center at the U of Oregon, The Center for Media Engagement at The U of Texas Austin, and the Minnesota Journalism Center. More information is available here: https://medium.com/engaged-journalism-bridging-research-and-practice


FRI
24 MAY

 

Environmental Communication Beyond Boundaries: Transnational, International, and Comparative Approaches to Understanding Environmental Issues

OFF-SITEGeorge Washington U‚ School of Public Health (Room TBD)

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

There will be a call for papers.


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Participants will be responsible for finding their own transportation.

OrganizersSuzannah Evans Comfort, Indiana U Bruno Takahashi, Michigan State U Jagadish Thaker, Massey U Julia Metag, U Freiburg

Contactcomfort@indiana.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Environmental Communication Division and Global Communication and Social Change Division 

DescriptionPlease visit https://ica2019envcommbeyondboundaries.wordpress.com for complete details on submissions, travel stipends, and preconference schedule.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Riding or Lashing the Waves: Regulating Media for Diversity in a Time of Uncertainty

OFF-SITENational Press Club

24 May; 8:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Purdue U- College of Liberal Arts and LABEX ICCA - U of Paris 13

Contactsmatei@purdue.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication and Technology Division and Mass Communication Division

Description: The "Riding or lashing the waves? Regulating Media in a time of Uncertainty" ICA pre-conference focuses on the regulatory and policy changes needed to stabilize the path from traditional to future forms of media. A core component of our conversation is an in-depth exploration of choices for regulating or deregulating media to ensure media pluralism and diversity. The umbrella question is “what are the regulatory, policy, and production rules that can make future media diverse, embracing pluralism of perspectives and ideas, user-focused and civically-responsible, while remaining profitable?”
In other words, what legal frameworks, organizational innovations, self-regulation ideas or technologies can be or should not be used to maintain diversity and sustainability?
The pre-conference is the product of the cooperation between leading French and US academics and practitioners. The French participants include Nicolas Curien (http://ncurien.fr) a French Commissioner of the Council for Audio-Visual Media (CSA - FFC equivalent); Julie Ghibellini, a senior lecturer at the SciencePo school of advanced studies and a civil servant; Francois Moreau, Frank Rebillard, Fabrice Rochelandet from the Media Industries Laboratory of Excellence (https://icca.univ-paris13.fr/), funded by CNRS (French NSF); and Dr. Joseph Daniel, a political scientist former chief of staff of several French prime ministers and presidents of the National Assembly. On the US side will participate, Brian Lamb, the founder of C-Span and an alumnus of Purdue University, Phil Napoli, from Duke University, Lee Rainie, the head of the Pew Internet Research unit at the Pew Research Center and Sorin Adam Matei, Associate Dean of Research, College of Liberal Arts, Purdue University.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Internet Governance and Communication Beyond Boundaries

OFF-SITE | Internet Governance Lab at the American U

24 May; 8:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDmitry Epstein* (The Hebrew U of Jerusalem and the Global Internet Governance Academic Network), Laura DeNardis and Kenneth Merrill* (Internet Governance Lab at American U)

Contactdima.e@mail.huji.ac.ilkmerrill@american.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication and Technology Division and Communication Law and Policy Division 

DescriptionIn the spirit of the ICA conference theme, this event will focus on the issue of boundaries in internet governance both as a substantive topic of research and as a reflexive exercise for internet governance as a research domain. Substantively, within internet governance, boundaries have been traditionally an important area of research starting with question of sovereignty and jurisdiction in cyberspace, and reaching to the exploration of boundaries of the technical, legal, social, and political decision-making with constitutive effects on the internet. As a field of study, internet governance has been debating its disciplinary boundaries as well as the scope of research questions that can come under this broad label. Thus, on the one hand, the pre-conference will cover a broad range of internet governance topics touching on the regulation, design, and use of the internet, and their impacts on the ordering of the Net. On the other hand, the pre-conference will pay particular attention to reflections on internet governance as a field of study, including epistemological and practical challenges of conducting internet governance research. This pre-conference, co-organized by the Internet Governance Lab at American University and by the Global Internet Governance Academic Network (GigaNet), will bring together ICA participants interested questions of governance, GigaNet members from other disciplines, and the local community of practitioners and policymaker.


FRI
24 MAY

 

From Knowledge to Action: Enhancing the Impact of Health Communication Research and Practice

OFF-SITEGeorge Washington U, Milken Institute School of Public Health, 950 New Hampshire Ave, NW, 7th Floor, Washington, DC 20052

24 May; 8:30 - 16:30

There will not be a call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation. Participants will be given instructions on how to navigate the Metro to arrive on campus.

OrganizersMonique Turner, George Washington U; Rajiv Rimal, George Washington U; Gary Kreps, George Mason U; Itzhak Yanovitzky, Rutgers U; Jeff Niederdeppe, Cornell U

Contactmmturner@gwu.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Health Communication Division 

DescriptionThere is a strong theoretical and research foundation for health communication at many levels, but many in the field seek broader impact. This pre-conference will bring together a variety of funders, scholars, practitioners, representative of community organizations, and participants in an effort to exchange knowledge and strategies for enhancing the impact of our health communication work. The pre-conference will mix short presentations with small round-table discussions in an effort to share knowledge and develop networks.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Justice and Order in the Datafied Society: Connecting Communications and Legal Theory

OFF-SITEThe Washington College of Law, American U, Washington DC

24 May; 8:00 - 16:30

There will not be a call for papers.


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The venue is at 4300 Nebraska Avenue NW, Washington 20016. Attendees will be given clear directions from the main conference hotel.

OrganizersNICK COULDRY, LSE, UK; LINA DENCIK, DATA JUSTICE LAB, CARDIFF UNIVERSITY, UK; ANDREAS HEPP, ZEMKI, BREMEN, GERMANY; KARIN VAN ES, DATA SCHOOL, UTRECHT, HOLLAND with support of Pat Aufderheide, American U, DC

Contactn.couldry@lse.ac.uk; dencikl@cardiff.ac.uk; ahepp@uni-bremen.de; K.F.vanEs@uu.nl

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication and Technology Division and Philosophy Theory and Critique Division

DescriptionThe growth of automated data collection, processing and analysis, and its installation within contemporary social, economic and political orders has created a number of huge challenges: for protecting fundamental rights and values such as freedom and autonomy, for understanding the connections between communications and social order, for sustaining key institutional processes such as the law, and for maintaining the very legitimacy and authority of decision-making by legal, political and social institutions. At the core of these challenges is a more basic question: what happens to society when communications (in the novel form of datafication and, underlying that, automated symbolic categorizations within database structures) begin to play a historically new role in the organization of life? This question requires communication researchers to be in dialogue with researchers in law and policy to address this fundamental question of communication beyond borders. Specific topics to be addressed include:1. What ethical, legal and normative concepts are most helpful in building appropriate regulatory frameworks that manage the consequences of datafication? 2. How can we best theorise how economic legal and social institutions are being transformed by datafication?3. What forms of social order and social governance are emerging through datafication and algorithmic processes, and are they consistent with existing democratic models of social governance? What if they are not consistent?4. What are the specific implications of datafication processes for the authority of legal institutions and processes of legal decision-making?5. What can be learned, and what, if anything, must be unlearned from the European GDPR and EU legal proceedings against the abuse of market power by large technology companies? 6. What distinctive perspectives does the Global South on data and datafication and how can those perspectives be effectively integrated into discussions in the Global North?7. Generally, what are the common agendas and common questions that need to be formulated so that scholars in the fields of communications and law (and, more broadly, management and society) can come together around transdisciplinary solutions to the problematic implications of the datafied society?8. What practical resources and pathways are needed to help the voices of critical researchers in this area be heard better and more widely?Committed speakers so far are: Keynotes: Julie Cohen, Georgetown School of Law, author of Configuring the Networked Self and (forthcoming) Between Truth and Power; Mark Andrejevic, Monash University, Melbourne and author of Infoglut (2013) and iSpy (2007).Panel speakers: [communications] Payal Arora, Erasmus, Rotterdam; Alison Hearn, Western Ontario; Anna Lauren Hoffman, U of Washington; Thomas Poell, U of Amsterdam; Joseph Turow, UPenn[law] Ellen Goodman, Rutgers; Natali Helberger, U of Amsterdam; Frank Pasquale, U of Maryland; Andrew Selbst, Data and Society, New York; Wolfgang Schulz, Hans-Bredow-Institut, Hamburg. 














FRI
24 MAY

 

10th Annual Doctoral Consortium of the Communication and Technology Division, co-sponsored by the Mobile Communication Interest Group

OFF-SITE | Location not known at this time.

24 May; 8:30 - 17:00

Invite by invitation only

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersMarjolijn Antheunis*, Tilburg U, Netherlands (Director) Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig Maximillian U, Germany (Steering Committee member) Katy Pearce, U of Washington, USA (Steering Committee member) German Neubaum, U of Duisburg-Essen, Germany (Steering Committee member)

Contactm.l.antheunis@uvt.nl

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication and Technology Division and Mobile Communication Interest Group

DescriptionThe consortium will bring together PhD candidates conducting research on various types of communication technologies and mobile communication to give them the opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and international atmosphere. The objectives of the event are to provide feedback and advice to participating PhD candidates on their in-progress research thesis. Moreover, the doctoral consortium will provide the opportunity to meet experts as well as fellow PhD candidates from different backgrounds working on related topics. During the consortium, students and faculty will be organized into groups of 5-8 people, determined by the thematic nature of the research. One group will be dedicated to mobile communication, the remaining groups to the broader area of communication and technology. In each group, students will be invited to present their work, and receive feedback from their fellow students and faculty participants, all of whom will have read the proposals in advance of the Doctoral Consortium (DC). Each proposal will receive detailed feedback from two to three faculty participants. There will also be two poster sessions to allow participants from other groups to learn about and comment on the research of the PhD candidates. In addition to the presentation and critique of proposals, there will be discussion of issues related to making the transition from graduate student to faculty member. The topics will include positioning one's  work for the job market, strategies for publication, the interviewing process and other aspects of faculty job searches. Anticipating a time when participants will have an academic position, the discussion will include issues like managing workload and working relationships, finding a work/life balance, and ways of being a successful academic. The goal of the DC is to provide a unique professional development and intellectual opportunity for those doctoral candidates who seek to make an innovative and original contribution to our understanding of information and communication technologies (ICTs) and mobile communication, with the primary focus on communication aspects of particular technological characteristics. Based on feedback from participants, the DC has been very successful in the past. We hope to continue the tradition in Washington.


FRI
24 MAY

 

Political Communication Division Graduate Student Preconference

OFF-SITE | George Washington U

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Invite by invitation only

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersKimberly Gross

Contactkimgross@gwu.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Political Communication Division 

DescriptionPre-conference for Ph.D. students in Political Communication. Students have oppotunity to present work and get feedback from senior scholars in the field as well as other graduate students. The conference provides an important opportunity for young scholars to meet and share work.


FRI
24 MAY

 

ICA PhD Workshop: Public Relations and Strategic Communication

OFF-SITE | Location not determined at this time.

24 May; 9:00 - 13:00 (half-day)

Invite by invitation only

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersKaterina Tsetsura, Flora Hung-Baesecke

Contacttsetsura@ou.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Public Relations Division

DescriptionThis workshop is for PhD students within the research field of Public Relations and Strategic Communication at different stages of their dissertation process. The aim of the seminar is to provide doctoral students in the field of Public Relations and Strategic Communication with an opportunity to discuss their dissertation research in a constructive atmosphere. Students receive feedback and advice on their projects, theoretical frameworks, methodologies and research designs from senior scholars and other students, who review the proposals. The workshop also serves as a platform for students working in these areas to establish a valuable network and examine issues which are important for their future careers. It provides a basis for general discussions a variety of other issues. Senior scholars in the field will give more insight on questions and the specific areas of public relations research that are discussed in the PhD projects with a focus on:• Theoretical developments: Emerging perspectives, models and theories in the field of Public Relations and strategic communication (e.g., institutional theory, CCO, etc.) and in specific fields (e.g., crisis communication, CSR, new media) • Methodological developments: Methodologies, empirical challenges and solutions are discussed and evaluated with regard to the field of PR • Publication strategies: By reviewing other students' papers and taking part in the discussions students learn also more about the reviewing process as well as improving their skills on how to write, submit and revise papers for top journals. 






FRI
24 MAY

 

Crossing Boundaries in Visual Communication Research

OFF-SITE | Location not determined at this time

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersRebecca Venema, U della Svizzera italiana, Lugano, Switzerland, rebecca.venema@usi.ch (primary contact)

Contactrebecca.venema@usi.ch

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Visual Communication Studies Division

DescriptionContemporary societies are highly visualized and mediatized environments: “traditional” media but also Social Networking Sites, platforms and everyday interactions and interpersonal communication are highly saturated with visuals as sharing photographs, GIFs, memes and videos has become a routine everyday practice. Visual communication practices, visual representations and visual rhetorics can have important functions for (re)establishing, communicating and crossing boundaries in e.g. close social relationships (e.g., Van House, 2011; Villi, 2015), in political communication (e.g., Brantner & Lobinger, 2014), social critique and political protest (e.g., Milner, 2013; Mina, 2014; Doerr, Mattoni, & Teune, 2013) or journalistic coverage (Coleman, 2010), not at least due to the associative and polysemic nature of the visual mode (e.g., Müller & Özcan, 2007; Messaris, & Abraham, 2001), the capacity of visuals to evoke emotions (Kappas & Müller, 2006), the picture superiority effect (Graber 1990) and the power of iconic photographs (Perlmutter, 1998). It is thus timely to consider, further analyze and discuss the complex role of visual communication in crossing boundaries in politics, culture and society and to draw attention to  boundary crossings with/through visual practices: What do different actors do with visuals? What kind of symbolical and material uses of visual media are employed for/in boundary crossings?  visual representations of boundary crossings: Which visual representations of social, cultural, political boundary crossings do we encounter in different media environments? How can we characterize these visuals? How are they produced and how are they perceived by which audiences? historical perspectives: What can we learn from historical perspectives and the role of visual communication in boundary crossings in the past? the role of visuals in re-defining the boundaries between fact and fake, in politics of knowledge as photographic images were often designated as “objective proofs and evidence” (e.g., Lasica, 1989)?At the same time, these research desiderata also demand for discussing current challenges and future directions for individual projects dealing with visual communication and boundary crossings in contemporary societies but also for the interdisciplinary field of visual communication research in general. Visual communication studies are a field of research interest that by tradition crosses the boundaries of research fields and disciplines. Hence, thinking about aspects of boundary crossings in the field also relates to questions of  crossing methodological, theoretical and conceptual boundaries: How can visual communication research inform, provide specific expertise and be informed, both theoretically and methodologically, by other disciplines and fields? Where are potentials, where are possible pitfalls for visual communication research? ethical boundary crossings: Which ethical challenges do occur in visual communication research?Formats The preconference will consist of several formats: First, in an opening keynote, Luc Pauwels will address the multifaceted questions, aspects and challenges of crossing boundaries in visual communication research.

Second, in a presentation session that combines brief oral and poster presentations, young scholars will present their research projects. All young and senior scholars will participate in these presentation sessions. The presenters thus will receive substantial feedback on their projects from experienced senior scholars, their assigned peer respondents and the other participants, and will have the possibility to network and to discuss challenges and best-practice options. Third, young scholars and senior experts split into smaller workshop groups. In these parallel sessions, young scholars and senior scholars with thematically and/or methodologically related research projects will be grouped together. The small groups will then further discuss the research projects as well as current challenges and future directions for visual communication research. Finally, in a closing plenary with all participants, key insights originating from the focused discussions in the workshop groups will be summarized. Moreover, we will discuss ideas and plans for future networking, collaboration and research events. 


FRI
24 MAY

ICA 2019 Journalism Studies Graduate Student Colloquium

OFF-SITE | Location not determined at this time

24 May; 9:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersAlla Rybina, a PhD candidate from the University of Gothenburg, Sweden

Contactalla.rybina@jmg.gu.se

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Journalism Studies Division 

DescriptionThe Journalism Studies Graduate Student Colloquium brings together PhD candidates working in journalism studies with experienced scholars in the field. The Colloquium is part of the Journalism Studies Division‚ commitment to academic mentorship and will be held as preconference in conjunction with the 2019 Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in Washington, USA. Its goal is to contribute actively to the professional development of young scholars by giving them an opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and international atmosphere. Participating graduate students will receive project-specific feedback from recognized experts in the field, as well as general career development advice. The Colloquium will thus provide the opportunity to meet experts as well as fellow PhD candidates working on related topics.


FRI
24 MAY

 

#CommunicationSoWhite: Discipline, Scholarship, and the Media

OFF-SITE | Location not determined at this time.

24 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersAlfred L. Martin, Jr., Eve Ng, Anamik Saha, Khadijah Costley White

Contactalfred-martin@uiowa.edu, evecng@hotmail.com, a.saha@gold.ac.uk, khadijah.white@rutgers.edu

DescriptionIn a recent article, Chakravartty et al. (Chakravartty, Paula, Rachel Kuo, Victoria Grubbs, and Charlton McIlwain. 2018. “#CommunicationSoWhite.” Journal of Communication, 68(2), 254–266) noted that White supremacy dominates both the field of communication studies and the mediated discourse we study. More specifically, they find that scholars of color continue to be underrepresented within the field in regards to citations, editorial positions, and publications. As a result, these exclusionary practices “reproduce institutional racism and sexism,” strengthen existing hierarchies, and “translate into social structures where resources are organized and distributed along racial lines.” ICA President Paula Gardner echoed similar sentiments in her 2018 presidential address, calling for steps for inclusion and diversity within the International Communication Association as well as the larger field. The exclusion of feminist, post-colonial, indigenous and POC voices is a persistent and systemic problem in the fields of communication and media studies, and one we aim to discuss, consider, and intervene in through this pre-conference. This pre-conference will offer panels, roundtables, and keynote presentations to consider who tends to be hired and who serves leaders/gatekeepers in the field, the politics of citation and publication, and the production of communication scholarship in the context of the global rise of white supremacy and nationalism. We will also highlight the ways that #CommunicationSoWhite can function as an intervention within communication studies organizations, departments, and scholarship. We aim to extend the topics of this pre-conference into the larger conference, continuing the conversation and promoting a larger interdisciplinary dialogue that addresses inequality/lack of diversity within the field. To this end, we plan to organize joint roundtables or panels with divisions and interest groups such as Communication and Technology, Feminist Scholarship, Journalism Studies, LGBTQ Studies, Philosophy of Communication, Political Communication, and Popular Communication. We also anticipate that these divisions will contribute towards the cost of the pre-conference.



FRI
24 MAY

 

Sports Communication and Social Justice

OFF-SITEInstitute on Disability and Public Policy at American University, Washington - http://www.idppglobal.org

24 May; 9:00 - 16:30

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDr Dan Jackson, Dr Emma Pullen and Prof Michael Silk (Bournemouth U) and Dr Filippo Trevisan (American U, Washington)

Contactjacksond@bournemouth.ac.uk; epullen@bournemouth.ac.uk; msilk@bournemouth.ac.uk

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Activism, Communication and Social Change Interest Group and Sports Communication Interest Group

Description

Keynote speaker: Prof Marie Hardin (Penn State)

Media sport is a highly celebrated constituent of popular culture that often intersects with shifting political, economic, technological and cultural conditions. This context creates tensions regarding issues of power and justice, particularly where media representations are framed around normative or ‘accepted’ production values, entrenched practices or financial imperatives by dominant organisations that can contribute to the symbolic stereotyping of marginalised groups.

 

At the same time, leading athletes from traditionally marginalized groups have been able to seize on their visibility to highlight issues of inequality and discrimination through innovative and highly symbolic forms of protest, from Tommie Smith and John Carlos’s Black Power Salute at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics to Colin Kaepernick’s kneeling protest in 2016. In recent years, these iconic moments have sparked a flurry of debate on social media, where communities have coalesced around hashtags such as #takingaknee and the U.S. women soccer team’s high profile “Equal Play. Equal Pay” campaign. While legacy media organizations continue to play an important role in how these debates are framed, they have also become a catalyst for contributions from a range of actors including politicians, grassroots groups, and global brands interested in sponsorship deals.

 

The rapidly evolving sport media industry and the changing face of mediated sport production therefore continues to raise original critical questions in new emerging contexts.

 

This one-day preconference pays attention to issues of sport, representation, power and social justice. The preconference is sponsored by the ICA Interest Groups for Sports Communication, and Activism, Communication and Social Justice, but we welcome submissions that span the disciplinary interests of ICA and beyond. Crossing disciplinary boundaries – the theme of the 2019 ICA conference – is encouraged in proposed papers.

 

We welcome theoretical and empirical inquiries that examine the following areas and other relevant topics:

 

·      The conditions that impinge on production, and the place and thoughts of cultural producers in articulating and dis-articulating fields of representation;

·      The emergence, resistance and contestation of new sport cultures via mainstream and alternative sport media platforms;  

·      The framing, marketing and production of dominant cultural narratives in the context of a neoliberalised enterprise sport media culture;

·      The dynamics of public opinion and audience meaning-making with respect to sport, politics and social justice;

·      The negotiation of identity politics in sport media representation, in particular, issues of (in)visibility (and resistance) of marginalised, non-normative groups who remain mostly under-represented in mainstream sport media (e.g. gender, race, disability, sexuality);

·      The use of sporting platforms as a vehicle for social justice campaigns by athletes, grassroots groups, and other actors;

·      The role of nationalism, representations of the ‘national normative body’ and ‘imagined communities’ (Anderson’s 1983) through sport media;



FRI
24 MAY

 

Controlling Bits and Systems: The Global Future of Privacy, Technology and Public Policy in AI

OFF-SITE | Georgetown University Law Center
600 New Jersey Avenue, NW
Washington, DC 20001

24 May; 8:30 - 17:30

Call for Papers

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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersLorraine Kisselburgh

Contactlorraine@purdue.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication and Technology Division, and Communication Law and Policy Division 

DescriptionPrivacy has presented itself as a central and contested concept in global communications. Over the
second half of the 20th century, privacy came to mean control of one's personal information.
Though privacy is never easy no matter its definition and practice, control strains under the weight
of the realities of 21st century digital life. International strife around who controls information and
how that control leads to power has generated interesting and global discussions about privacy. We
seek to take advantage of both the location and theme of the conference by: 1) unpacking what
types of perspectives and approaches American policymakers and policy actors take, 2) further
critiquing and playing and provoking ideas to inspire new angles and outside-the-box thinking, and
3) creating a productive plan of action to develop meaningful communication research in the area
of privacy, technology, and public policy.
There is significant need and demand for privacy scholarship to help understand and prevent the
challenging issues that have presented in the past few years including data privacy and consent in
social computing environments, government surveillance, algorithmic bias, and ubiquitous location
tracking via mobile devices. This demand is situated within complicated global politics, as well as
complex and rapidly changing technical environments. Additionally, there is an ongoing demand
from policy makers and legislative professionals to learn from and be guided by emerging research
scholarship. Because of overwhelming datafication efforts, privacy today often means digital
privacy and cannot be considered without attention to the design, systems, markets, players, and
incentives within which privacy is conceptualized and practiced. The event will take meaningful
steps toward meeting the demand present in Washington.
This pre-conference will be a cross-disciplinary gathering hosted by the Communication
Technology Division and the Communication Law & Policy Division, addressing both national and
global issues in privacy technology policy and law. As such, the preconference advances the ICA
2019 conference theme, "Communication Beyond Boundaries,” by furthering cross-disciplinary
investigation of privacy, technology, policy and communication, and considering these issues on a
global scale.


POSTCONFERENCES


WED
29 MAY

Politics, Gender and Communication: Theoretical Insights and Empirical Evidence.

Washington Hilton

29 May | 8:30 - 18:00

Call for papers


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OrganizersLoes Aaldering* and Daphne van der Pas Contact person: Dr. Loes Aaldering Post-Doc Political Communication Research Group Department of Communication U of Vienna Althanstrasse 14 (UZA 2),1090 Vienna, Austria +431427748310 loes.aaldering@univie.ac.at

Contactloes.aaldering@univie.ac.at

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Political Communication Division

DescriptionWomen are almost universally underrepresented in politics. Although the norm of gender equality has been widely supported in Western societies for decades, this has not translated into gender-equal politics: while there has been a wide range of female governors, legislators, (prime) ministers and party leaders, a large majority of the higher offices and governing positions are still filled by men. This post-conference focusses on two possible explanations of the underrepresentation of females in political life: 1) The campaign strategies of politicians. As politicians have to deal with different stereotypes that exist in the electorate, male and female politicians are likely to highlight different issues, character traits, aspects of their background and ambitions for the future in their communication to the public. This post-conference invites papers that study differences in political campaign strategies and the controlled communication of the candidate (for instance on social media), and/or the differences in the impact of these political messages for male and female politicians on voters. 2) Coverage of politicians by the media. Not only the behavior of politicians is relevant in current-day political reality: Politicians operate in a strongly mediatized political environment where the media are citizens’ primary source of political information. Thus, a systematic gender bias in the media coverage of politicians is likely to contribute to the underrepresentation of women in politics. This post-conference welcomes papers that study the differences in the portrayal of males and females in political life in the media or online, whether it be the quantity of the media attention or the content of the coverage. The goal of this post-conference is to discuss relevant and interesting research on the intersection of gender, politics and communication, that helps us understand whether there are, and if so why there are, gender differences in media coverage and candidate communication in the political world. We welcome both theoretical and empirical papers and we would like to bring together qualitative and quantitative researchers, employing experimental designs, interviews, content analysis, survey studies or other relevant methods. Papers that explicitly aim to strengthen our understanding of the causality involved gender differences or communication effects are encouraged. In addition, we are also particularly interested in papers that employ cutting edge research methods to study political communication in an automated fashion. We believe this post-conference is especially relevant for researchers in the Political Communication Division, and we plan to publish selected contributions in a special issue of a ranked journal.

 


WED
29 MAY

Badass Ladies of Communication: The Challenges and Opportunities for Female Scholars, Success in the Field

OFF-SITE | Northwestern U DC Office

29 May; 13:00 - 17:30 (half-day)

Invite by invitation only

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Nikki Usher (Illinois); Brooke Erin Duffy (Cornell); Kjerstin Thorson (Michigan State); Lea Hellemueler (Houston); Valerie Belair-Gagnon (Minnesota); Stephanie Edgerly (Northwestern); Shannon McGregor (Utah); Kimberly Meltzer (Marymount)

Contactnusher@illinois.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Feminist Studies Division, Journalism Studies Division, Political Communication Division

Description: This post-conference builds on two years of informal social gatherings convened at ICA to build fellowship and exchange professionalism tactics among those who gender-identify as women and have completed their PhD. In the wake of #metoo, the unique needs of female scholars in their promotion and career success merit careful consideration. The post-conference will provide panels with skill-building in public engagement (media training and social media strategy), academic promotion, and field assessments of senior female scholars. Participants will be notified of their selection on March 1, 2019. Please see https://badassladiesofcommunication.weebly.com for more details.

 


WED
29 MAY

Building Bridges Between Scholarship and Advocacy for Digital Media Policy

OFF-SITEAmerican U

29 May | 9:00 - 16:00

Call for papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersAmanda Lotz, Queensland U of Technology, Christopher Ali, U of Virginia; Phillip Napoli, Duke U

Contactdrtvlotz@gmail.com

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Communication Law and Policy; Media Industry Studies; Activism, Communication and Social Justice; Communication and Technology

DescriptionDigital communication has produced extraordinary changes around the globe. Whether for our personal communication, the operation of media industries, or countless daily tasks, internet access and the rules by which companies providing internet service and companies that rely on the internet to provide services structure daily activities for billions of people. It has also led to a number of new policy issues and exacerbated old ones. New issues, like network neutrality and global internet governance compete for regulatory and popular attention with endemic issues such as ownership concentration and universal service. These, and many others have stymied national regulators and hampered global policy conversations. Taking note of the many outstanding policy issues - both new and old - that come to the fore in the digital age, and the importance of multistakeholderism in digital communication policy making, this postconference focuses on some of the major policy issues surrounding digital communication and brings together experts on these topics from the ranks of both scholars and policy activists. The event will focus on three digital media policy issues that impact structural regulation: universal broadband access, competition, and revisiting policy for legacy media industries. The themes of bridging activist and scholarly engagement with these issues and the challenges of setting national policy for transnational media distribution systems will be addressed in discussion of each issue. The overarching goal is to provide venue in which policy researchers and policy activists can learn from one another, identify synergies, and cultivate collaborations. In addition to providing a rich intellectual experience, the preconference takes advantage of a key attribute of the 2019 ICA conference location and will reach out to many policy organizations and activists that call Washington home. The event will also create a valuable networking space to help facilitate connection and collaboration among scholars and activists focusing on common issues. The open call will request submissions of brief policy proposals rather than the type of scholarly research likely to be presented in regular conference sessions. Accepted proposals will be circulated to attendees in advance of the postconference so that the day can focus on engaged discussion and provide ample opportunity for attendees who are not presenting briefs to also participate in the days events.

 


WED
29 MAY

Lobbying: Communicative Power and Transnational Contexts

OFF-SITEAmerican U, School of Public Affairs

29 May | 9:30 - 18:00

This will have call for papers.

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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDr. Scott Davidson

Contactsd310@le.ac.uk

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Public Relations, Public Diplomacy

DescriptionThe working theme of the event is to link inequalities in the communicative power of lobbying with the increasing relevance of public policy and opinion environments that span national boundaries. Streams within this theme may be split between theorising and studies on specific issues and a stream on technological and methodological innovations.

 


WED
29 MAY

The Rise of Platforms: Individual, Institutional, and Governance Questions for Communications Research

OFF-SITESchool of Media and Public Affairs, George Washington U

29 May | 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDaniel Kreiss, Erika Franklin-Fowler, Sarah Anne Ganter, Natali Helberger, Shannon McGregor, Rasmus Nielsen

Contactdkreiss@email.unc.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Political Communication, Journalism Studies, Communication Law and Policy

Description:  Platform companies such as Google, Facebook, and Twitter are increasingly central to most forms of mediated communication around the world and thus to most of the individual, institutional and governance questions that communication research deals with. 
These companies – and their counterparts elsewhere like Alibaba and Tencent in mainland China and Yandex and VKontakte in Russia – have built large and diverse user bases around their global digital platforms that enable different types of interactions and content. In the process, in countries throughout the world these platforms host much public and commercial information, organize attention and access to it, create new formats for it, and control data about it. In doing so, these platforms shape the incentive structures around investments in public communication (including by news media, political campaigns, and social movements) as well as commercial communication (including much advertising, public relations, and entertainment.)
By becoming a part (sometimes large, sometimes small) of what almost everybody does with media almost everywhere in the world, these platforms increasingly play an important role in everything from journalism and political communication to health and popular communication. While these platforms and their algorithms, policies, content, and organization are the subject of a growing volume of impressive scholarship across communication subfields, there is a risk that substantive, theoretical, and methodological discussions around the rise of platforms and what they mean are fragmented as a consequence of scholarly specialization and that important insights from one field are overlooked elsewhere. This is of critical importance as these platforms continue to expand their out-sized influence on political and social processes around the world. 

The pre-conference will combine panel presentations, a roundtable, a keynote panel, and structured informal discussion among the participants to pose, analyze, and answer the significant questions about platforms and social and political life. 

 

 


WED
29 MAY

Value and Morality in Public Discourse

OFF-SITEGeorgetown U Department of Linguistics

29 May | 8:30 - 17:30

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersJessica Robles (Loughborough U), Cynthia Gordon (Georgetown U), David Boromisza-Habashi (U of Colorado Boulder)

Contactdbh@colorado.edu, gordonc@georgetown.edu, J.J.Robles@lboro.ac.uk

Description:The Language and Social Interaction Division of ICA and the Department of Linguistics at Georgetown University invite ICA members and non-members to examine the interactional mechanisms, accomplishment, social consequentiality and cultural foundations of evaluations and assessments in public discourse. Led by three senior scholars in the field (Richard Buttny, Donal Carbaugh, and Deborah Tannen), participants will seek to identify gaps in social interaction research, emerging research themes and agendas, and relevant collaboration and publication opportunities.
Program:
8.30-9.00: Introductory remarks by the organizers
9.00-11.00: Panel featuring senior scholars sharing their analyses of an excerpt from public discourse data
11.00-11.30: Coffee break
11.30-12.30: Breakout sessions dedicated to further discussion of the same data excerpt
12.30-2.00: Lunch
2.00-4.00: Roundtable sessions dedicated to discussions of abstracts submitted for the postconference
4.00-4.30: Coffee break
4.30-5.30: Closing session featuring senior scholars from the morning panel reflecting on key themes and emerging research agendas
Participants representing all approaches within the LSI field (i.e., cultural, critical, discourse, EM/CA, practice and pragmatics approaches) are invited to register.
Participants who register are asked to submit to the organizers a brie


WED
29 MAY

Creator Governance: Platforms, Policy, Rights, and Regulation

OFF-SITEAmerican U School of Communication

29 May | 9:00 - 18:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Stuart Cunningham, Queensland U of Technology Patricia Aufderheide, American U Tarleton Gillespie, Microsoft Research David Craig, USC Annenberg* (primary contact) Colin Maclay, USC Annenberg Innovation Lab

Contact: david@medianation.biz

Description: Whether described as influencers, Youtubers, vloggers, or live streamers, creators are vanguard cultural producers and social media entrepreneurs. Creators also represent creative labor within emergent gig and artisanal economies. This conference convenes scholars, creators, activists, policy makers, and industry professionals to engage around concerns over and advocacy for more effective creator governance. As coined by Cunningham and Craig (2019), Social Media Entertainment (SME) describes an emerging industry disrupting the legacy media (Hollywood film, TV, publishing, and music) and advertising industries and most distinguished by creators. Creators harness multiple platforms (YouTube, Instagram, Twitter, Twitch, and more) to aggregate global fan communities. Creators are cultural producers, capable of fostering communities around more diverse forms of affinity, identity, and values than ever witnessed in mass media. Creators are also social media entrepreneurs operating complex business portfolios that include programmatic advertising, influencer marketing, e-commerce, and virtual gifts. More broadly, creators comprise central nodes within emerging “gig” and “creative economies”. Estimates are that up to 10% of the U.S. workforce is generating revenue off of social media platforms as of 2016. Despite the cultural and economic power of creators, scant attention has been paid to concerns around creator governance. Increasing demand for platform governance and over-reaction by the platforms would appear to have crippled marginalized and civic-minded creators (See “Adpocalypse”). Children’s media journalists and activists sometimes collapse distinctions between creators, advertisers, and naïve users. FTC disclosure rules effectively place greater burdens on creators than on celebrities. Global policy shifts like the EU’s Article 13 may prove disastrous for creators. While Hollywood guilds are starting to partner with creators, creators have also begun to self-organize. The conference will convene multiple stakeholders to discuss effective creator governance. How do creators reflect the future of work and creative labor in the emerging gig and artisanal economies? What rights should they have or do they deserve? How can creators be better protected and regulated by platforms and policy makers? What activist and labor organizations are best aligned with creators and their concerns? How might scholars better research, intervene, and advocate on behalf of creators engaging in responsible cultural and economic practices?


WED
29 MAY

Public Diplomacy in the 2020s

OFF-SITE | American U

29 May | 9:00 - 17:00

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Alina Dolea edolea@bournemouth.ac.uk

Description: The post-conference gathers PhD students, early career researchers, senior scholars and practitioners in public diplomacy with a focus to expand the PD body of knowledge, address gaps in the literature, inform and advance PD practices, heighten visibility of PD among policy makers in government and higher education. We aim to work towards identifying a new and innovative research agenda that recognizes how far PD scholarship has come since 9/11, consider where we need to go next, and discuss opportunities for innovative collaborations among multidisciplinary scholars crossing boundaries. The sessions include “Emerging PhD & postdoctoral research” (chair R. S. Zaharna, American U) , "State of the Art, State of the Future: New Directions in Public Diplomacy Research" (chair Kathy Fitzpatrick, American U), “Research-practice collaboration” (chairs Alina Dolea, Bournemouth U; James Pamment, Lund U), “Public Diplomacy practice” (chair Jay Wang, Center on Public Diplomacy). A networking lunch is scheduled to allow for more talks on presentations and collaborations in future projects.


WED
29 MAY

Privacy Research Across Cultural, Political, and Geographic Boundaries

OFF-SITE |

29 May | 8:00 - 16:30

This will have call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Kelly Quinn, Dmitry Epstein, Carsten Wilhelm and the Comparative Privacy Research Network kquinn8@uic.edu

Description: Drawing on conversations and collaborations forged at ICA and in several local and regional research projects at different points on the globe, this post-conference aims to attend to privacy’s cultural aesthetic, by bringing together scholars conducting research that examines cultural, political, and/or geographic aspects of privacy. The ultimate goal is to start a conversation within our discipline about the ways in which systematic comparative cross-cultural analyses of privacy might be conceptualized, theorized, and operationalized in ways that are both novel and authentic. We anticipate that the first half of this full day post-conference will be devoted to research presentations submitted through a cfp (see www.thinkmacro.org/cprn/ica2019). The second half of the post-conference will focus on workshopping a framework for comparative analysis of privacy in broad informational contexts, including social media, health and fitness monitoring, digital literacy, and IoT devices. We will concentrate on articulating basic principles and a core analytical framework to be used by the group for ongoing comparative privacy projects, and building collaborative working groups to facilitate future research.


WED
29 MAY

Essential Scholarship on Technology and Marginalization: A Discussion

OFF-SITE | Unitarian Universalist Church; 1100 G St NW, Washington, DC 20005

29 May | HALF-DAY 9:00 - 11:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Amy Gonzales, Brooke Foucault-Welles; Katy Pearce gonzales@comm.ucsb.edu

Description: From studies of marginalized groups, to algorithmic bias exacerbating marginalization, to the ethics of observing marginalized people online, a growing body of scholarship focuses on issues of marginalization and social media. Yet, we lack a common set of literature from which to draw definitions, theories, and frameworks for to guide research on social media and marginalization. This pre-conference asks scholars to consider the following questions: What inspires your research on social media and marginalization? What do you think is essential reading for scholars in this area? Is the work within the field or outside of the field?How do these ideas inform the practices of academia or your life? To build a cannon of extant research in this area, we invite interested scholars to present on a theory or piece of scholarship, from any discipline including communication, that is essential to their work on social media and marginalization. Participants will give short presentations on a theory/text that inspires them, elaborate briefly on its strengths and weaknesses, and explain why those interested in social media and marginalization would benefit from exposure the piece. We will also discuss actionable everyday activities that can be gleaned from this scholarship.

ICA welcomes your comments and questions. Please feel free to contact the ICA staff at anytime.

Contact

International Communication Association
1500 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC 20036 USA

Phone: (202) 955-1444

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