ICA 2020 - Pre and Postconferences
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Preconferences for ICA's 2020 Annual Conference will be held from Tuesday, 19 May to Thursday, 21 May 2020. Postconferences will be held on Wednesday, 27 May 2020. There are 35 different pre/postconferences. Registrations for pre/postconferences will be available 15 January 2020. There will be no on-site registration for pre/postconferences.


PRECONFERENCES


TUE
19 MAY

 

Open Communication: A Trans-disciplinary Approach to Strategic Communication in the 21st Century

OFF-SITE | RMIT U, Melbourne, Australia

19 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersKaterina Tsetsura, Marianne D. Sison, Jenny Robinson

Contact: tsetsura@ou.edu; marianne.sison@rmit.edu.au; jenny.robinson@rmit.edu.au

Division/Interest Group AffiliationCommunication & Technology Division, Human-Machine Communication Interest Group, Instructional and Developmental Communication Division

Description: The pre-conference will address the challenges and opportunities for trans-disciplinary education and practice in communication, specifically strategic communication that is complicated by contemporary rise of highly sophisticated technology and artificial intelligence. We plan to engage communication scholars as well as scholars from other disciplines to interrogate these questions from the perspective of 21st Century trans-disciplinary education and global, outcomes-based practice. The pre-conference will serve as a platform for communication scholars and others working in higher education and practice to establish a valuable network and examine trans-disciplinary issues that will affect the future of strategic communication education. The pre-conference will provide a basis for general discussion on a variety of related issues.


TUE
19 MAY

 

Memorial Publics: A workshop on innovative research methods and emerging issues in public communication around the dead and their memorials

OFF-SITE | Griffith U Southbank Campus Brisbane
The Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research,
US02_7.16/7.07 Webb Centre Building, Board Rm & Function Space

19 May; 9:30 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers:Larissa Hjorth (RMIT); Margaret Gibson (Griffith U); *Bjorn Nansen (Melbourne U)

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Popular Communication Division

Contact: nansenb@unimelb.edu.au

DescriptionThis one-day pre-conference workshop, supported by the the Death Online Research Network the DeathTech Research Network at the University of Melbourne, and the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research, aims to bring together a diverse range of scholars working across the many disciplines with an interest in the intersection of death, media, and public memorialising. In keeping with the theme of the 70th annual ICA conference, the workshop aims to support openness of communication through an interdisciplinary approach, and through an inclusive format of short presentations followed by lengthy discussions around emerging and innovative research methods and issues in the field of death and media and communications research. The focus of the workshop is centred on questions of openness in the public engagement around communicating and memorialising the deceased across digital spaces and platforms, and in the mediation of public spaces by digital and mobile technologies. Across the diverse places and spaces in which the dead are remembered and memorialised, increasingly tricky questions are emerging around the norms, protocols, and practices of memorial publics, including questions of access, obligation, trust and ethics, which this workshop will explore.

 



WED
20 MAY

 

Emerging Media and Social Change: The Asian-Pacific Experience in Global Context (Also The 9th Global Communication Forum)

OFF-SITE | U of New South Wales, Sydney

23 May; 8:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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The off-site venue is located in Sydney’s Kensington and Randwick areas. It is close to Sydney Domestic Airport (7 Km). Participants can catch a flight to Gold Coast (Coolangatta) by taking a taxi (15-20 minutes) or riding a public bus “400N” (40-50 minutes) to the domestic airport. There are numerous hotels near Airport areas and in the City Center (plenty buses to go there, taking 20-30 minutes). Some smaller hotels and lodges are also available near UNSW

OrganizersOrganizers: -- School of the Arts & Media, U of New South Wales, Australia -- School of Media and Communication (SJTU), Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China -- Global Communication Research Institute, Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China Co-organizers: -- Communication and Technology Section (CAT), International Communication Association -- USC-SJTU Institute of Cultural and Creative Industry(ICCI), China -- Department of Communication, U of South Florida, USA¬† -- Société Française des Sciences de l'Information et de la Communication, France -- School of Communication, Hong Kong Baptist U, Hong Kong -- Department of New Media and Communication, National U of Singapore, Singapore -- Department of Communication and Technology, National Chiao Tung U, Taiwan Organizing Committee: -- Guoliang Zhang (Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China; zhanggl@sjtu.edu.cn) -- Elaine Jing Zhao (U of New South Wales, Australia; jing.zhao@unsw.edu.au) -- Ramaswami Harindranath (U of New South Wales, Australia; r.hari@unsw.edu.au) -- Benqian Li (Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China; benqian@126.com) -- Patrice Buzzanell (U of South Florida, USA; pmbuzzanell@usf.edu) -- Ran Wei (Chinese U of Hong Kong, Hong Kong; WEI2@mailbox.sc.edu) Executive Committee: -- Liangwen Kuo (Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China; lwkuo@sjtu.edu.cn) -- Elaine Jing Zhao (U of New South Wales, Australia; jing.zhao@unsw.edu.au) -- Pearl Wang Haoqing (Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China; pearlwang@sjtu.edu.cn) -- Qian Wang (Shanghai Jiao Tong U, China; wang_qian@sjtu.edu.cn)

Contact: lwkuo@sjtu.edu.cn

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Communication & Technology Division

DescriptionThe world is constantly witnessing invention and intervention of emerging media. This pre-conference aims to create dialogues on whether, and in what ways, these inventions and their affordances offer greater opportunities for more open communication and/or constraints for knowledge-creation, -sharing, and –surveillance. Although open to other contexts, this pre-conference focuses on Asian-Pacific and Australasian experiences and their contributions to understanding new modes of communication and media ecologies at local, regional and global levels.


WED
20 MAY

 

Mobile Communication and Opportunities for Open Science: 18th Annual ICA Mobile Pre-conference 2020

OFF-SITE |  Queensland Art Gallery | Gallery of Modern Art in Brisbane

20 May; 8:30 - 17:00 

There will be a call for papers.


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OrganizersChair: Keri K. Stephens, The U of Texas at Austin (keristephens@austin.utexas.edu) Vice Chair(s): Rich Ling, Larissa Hjorth, Heather Horst, Caitlin McGrane, Katy Pearce, Colin Agur, Mariek Vanden Abeele, Scott Campbell, Gerard Goggin, Ragan Glover

Division/Interest Group AffiliationMobile Communication Interest Group

Contactkeristephens@austin.utexas.edu

DescriptionFor 17 years, the ICA Mobile Pre-Conference has been an interdisciplinary gathering of scholars, researchers, and practitioners who focus on mobile communication research. In recent years, the mobile pre-conference has been organized in the form of several interactive Blue Sky workshops. These provide a venue where scholars can present, learn and discuss their latest ideas, research and skills around a limited number of themes related to mobile communication and mobile media. There has been a refocusing of the pre-conference around supporting the development of graduate students, junior scholars as well as scholars from the Global South. The pre-conference is seen as an opportunity to bring together a collection of colleagues who can brainstorm common research visions. A successful panel at the mobile pre-conference might produce a paper on their theme of choice or the publication of a special issue in a journal. The pre-conference is an opportunity for graduate students and new faculty to interact with more experienced mobile researchers to cultivate a supportive and integrated community of mobile scholars. Ideas discussed and presented at the mobile pre-conference have consistently nourished the theoretical and methodological foundations of mobile research, started joint research projects and eventually lead to publications in peer-reviewed journals. In addition to the Blue Sky workshops, the pre-conference features a conference lunch and dinner where scholars will interact in an informal and social atmosphere.


WED
20 MAY

 

Storytelling, Persuasion and Mobilization in the Digital Age

OFF-SITE |  U of Sydney, Sydney Policy Lab, RD Watt Building

20 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Organizers: Dr Filippo Trevisan, Prof Ariadne Vromen, Michael Vaughan

Contacttrevisan@american.edu

Division/Interest Group AffiliationActivism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group, Political Communication Division, Public Relations Division

Description: Storytelling is central to the persuasion and mobilization strategies of advocacy organizations, activist groups, NGOs, political parties, and campaigns. However, technological, communicative, and political changes have challenged traditional storytelling practices and incentivized significant innovation in this area in recent years. Changes in technology have transformed the scale and pace at which individual stories can be collected, digitally archived, curated, and then distributed through online platforms. Changes in communication and politics have increased the emphasis on personalized advocacy strategies targeted at affective publics (Papacharissi, 2015), as campaigners seek to navigate an increasingly fragmented and polarised information environment. Researchers today face a challenge in representing both the continuity in the narrative dimension of politics while also interrogating emerging and impactful innovations. This raises important questions about power dynamics and representations associated with changing storytelling practices, roles, and relationships between individual storytellers, organizations, and social groups in a constantly evolving media landscape. These questions are relevant to multiple related fields including, among others, the sociology of political communications (Polletta 2006), policy studies (Jones, Shanahan and McBeth 2014) journalism studies (Polletta and Callahan 2017), and public interest communication. This one-day preconference pays attention to these questions and brings together researchers from multiple disciplinary perspectives to discuss the impact of changing storytelling practices on individuals, groups, organizations, target publics, and public discourse more broadly. We welcome submissions from theoretical and empirical inquiries that examine the following areas:

• Reconciling conceptualizations of storytelling from intersecting perspectives in political life: in particular interest groups, social movements, NGOs, parties and political campaigns, as well as journalism;
• The impact of evolving digital communication technologies, including but not limited to social media, mobile devices, and database technology on the practice of persuasive storytelling;
• How publics and citizens respond to stories;
• The role of storytelling in response to changing political and media contexts, in particular the evolution of information consumption habits and the rise of “fake news;”
• The significance and impact of advocacy storytelling on the (in)visibility of groups that are traditionally marginalized and under-represented in public discourse (e.g. gender, LGBTQI+, race, ethnicity, disability, etc.);
• The outcomes of storytelling in politics, such as successes or failures in public policy;
• The ethics of storytelling and the power relationship between advocacy organizations and individual storytellers;
• Storytelling in a comparative and global context, such as the diffusion of storytelling practices between political actors and countries, as well as their relationship with culture and media environments;
• Innovative methodological approaches to study persuasive storytelling and analyze its impact.

Our credentials:

We have strong track records in hosting academic convenings, alongside international profiles that should attract a strong response to our call for papers.

Dr Filippo Trevisan is an Assistant Professor in the School of Communication at American University in Washington, D.C., where he is also the Deputy Director of the Institute on Disability and Public Policy (IDPP). His research explores the impact of new media technologies on advocacy, activism, and political communication. He has published widely on digital strategic communication, online organizing, and political campaigning. Among other publications, he is the author of “Disability Rights Advocacy Online: Voice, Empowerment and Global Connectivity” (Routledge, 2017). He has been invited to share his research at events organized by the United Nations, the European Parliament, and Google. His work has been featured on The Washington Post, the BBC, and Al-Jazeera English. He has convened panels at APSA and MeCCSA, and co-chairs the mini-track on social media, culture, identity and inclusion at the HICSS conference. In 2019, he co-organized a successful ICA pre-conference on Sport Communication & Social Justice, and currently is co-editing a special issue of the journal Communication and Sport based on the pre-conference.

Dr Ariadne Vromen is Professor of Political Sociology and Associate Dean for Research in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Sydney. Her research interests include: political participation, social movements, advocacy organisations, digital politics, and young people and politics. She is the author of several books on political participation and Australian politics, including “Digital Citizenship and Political Engagement” (Palgrave, 2017). Her current projects include an ARC-funded study of crowd-sourced political engagement and two SREI-funded projects on digital rights and women and the future of work respectively. She has organized several conferences, workshops, and roundtables on digital politics, most recently in collaboration with the Sydney Policy Lab, and is among the organizers of the annual Pop Politics Australia conference that brings together emerging and established researchers to discuss their latest work on political organizations and participation.

Michael Vaughan is a PhD candidate at the University of Sydney’s Department of Government and International Relations and recently submitted his doctoral dissertation looking at social movements around international tax justice after the financial crisis in the UK and Australia. He has already published several journal articles in Social Movement Studies, the Australian Journal of Political Science, and Media International Australia, focusing on both Australian politics and different dimensions of digital politics. In addition to his scholarly work, Michael’s professional background includes almost a decade working in politics as a campaigner and policy adviser for various NGOs and government. 


WED
20 MAY

 

Communication for Social Change: Activism, Trust-building, Responsiveness, and Responsibility

OFF-SITE | Queensland U of Technology, Gardens Point campus, Brisbane

20 May; 9:00 - 16:00 

Call for Papers


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Organizers: Anne Lane

Division/ Interest Group AffiliationOrganizational Communication Division|Public Relations Division

Contacta.lane@qut.edu.au

DescriptionAs we enter the third decade of the 21st century, societies around the world are characterised by the pervasiveness and power of communication networks. Multiple forms and channels of communication allow individuals and organisations to reach and interact with their networks of contacts in a variety of ways for many different purposes. Communication both constructs and enacts these networks, and provides mechanisms for groups and individuals to affect change at a societal level. In summary, this means changing society itself.Public relations, organizational communication and strategic communication are disciplines that have long been associated with efforts to encourage change through communication. However, the focus of these efforts has largely been the changing of stakeholder behaviour to suit organisations at an individual or group level. More recently, the emergence of the relational perspective in public relations and its synergies with stakeholder engagement and dialogue, as well as debates about creating shared value and corporate activism in corporate communications have shifted the focus onto the use of communication to create co-change at this meso level.The drive to harmonize corporate and societal needs is reflected by theoretical approaches that have emerged in corporate communications and strategic communication. These approaches are based on the understanding that corporate/organizational goals should not be limited to achieving shareholder value but also stakeholder value. This has seen the rise of concepts like “corporate shared value” (CSV) and “stakeholder value” instead of traditional CSR. More recently, the development of ideas like “corporate activism” and “CEO activism” (meaning that corporations can be agents of social change if governments, politicians, NGOs etc. are not able to move forward) reflect this.The emergent positioning of corporate organisations as civic institutions means there is now increasing awareness of, and interest in, the potential to use communication for change at a societal level. Adopting this macro level perspective on the outcomes and impacts of communication requires the revision and extension of existing theories and practices, and perhaps the use and integration of multiple disciplinary lenses to an extent that has not yet been fully realised. This approach might lead to a resolution of the dynamic tension at the heart of the move to achieve social change through communication: how can communication – renowned for its ability to foster the development of fractured, individual, and highly specific points of view – be used to create the generalised consensus required to generate social change? 






WED
20 MAY

 

The Challenges and the Opportunities for Female Leaders' Success in Communication

OFF-SITE | Griffith U Gold Coast campus

20 May; 13:00 - 17:00 (Half Day)

There will not be a call for papers.


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Attendees will meet at the conference hotel and public transportation costs will be covered for registered attendees. Please email bbarnett@butler.edu for pre-conference registration link.

Organizers

Angela Owusu-Ansah, Provost at Ashesi U, Ghana

Brooke Barnett, Dean, College of Communication, Butler U, United States

Lori Bergen, Founding Dean of the College of Media, Communication and Information U of Colorado Boulder, United States

Rochelle Ford, Dean, School of Journalism, Elon U, United States

Susan Forde, Director of the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Griffith U, Brisbane, Australia

Marie Hardin, Dean, Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications, Penn State, United States

Meghan Sanders, Director, Media Effects Lab, Manship School of Mass Communication, LSU

Contactbbarnett@butler.edu

Description: • What are good practices for training and mentoring female academic leaders and how can they be adopted in our discipline?• How do we develop an inclusive leadership culture that is respectful of epistemological differences, backgrounds/experiences, cultures and ethnicities?• How do we educate both emerging and established communication scholars about academic leadership?• What are the roles and responsibilities of different actors (universities, departments, etc.)?As the fields within mass communication adapt to changes in society, government and technology, those of us charged with educating the next generations of content producers, curators, managers and consumers must determine the best methods to do so. In addition to disruptions in our professional field, the academy is also facing a number of significant disruptions. The current and next generation of mass communication education leader need ongoing skill development to negotiate between student, faculty and industry interests, and institutional and societal expectations.The 2017 American College President study shows that women hold only 30 percent of College presidencies, but the vast majority are white women. People of color are only 17 percent of the top job holders at universities.As the fields within mass communication adapt to changes in society, government and technology, those of us charged with educating the next generations of content producers, curators, managers and consumers must determine the best methods to do so. In addition to disruptions in our professional field, the academy is also facing a number of significant disruptions. The current and next generation of mass communication education leader need ongoing skill development to negotiate between student, faculty and industry interests, and institutional and societal expectations.The 2017 American College President study shows that women hold only 30 percent of College presidencies, but the vast majority are white women. People of color are only 17 percent of the top job holders at universities.This pre-conference seeks to elevate the number of women who serve as chairs, deans, directors, and faculty leaders in communication. We seek to bring together women of various cultures, ethnicities, races and backgrounds to exchange skill-development and professionalism tactics among those interested in academic leadership. In this era of media evolution, the need for quality administrators to lead our programs has never been greater. We must become the leaders we need.Rationale: Women are making gains in the professoriate, but those gains are not at the highest ranks or most prestigious roles. Though frequently called upon to provide large amounts and visible and invisible service, female professors across the humanities, social sciences, and professional schools face an upward challenge when it comes to being promoted into formal leadership positions. The half-day post conference seeks to challenge these norms and ultimately foster a more multicultural leadership within the communication communities on university campuses.The pre-conference has two goals: 1) to help individuals understand their leadership strengths and weaknesses in order to reach career goals and 2) to provide an interdisciplinary and intersectional toolbox of strategies and information to foster greater success in academic leadership.The pre-conference features three breakout sessions and a wrap-up panel featuring top-level female international scholars and leaders. The first session will offer a discussion on leadership styles, how multiple and fluid identities intersect to influence those styles, and how leadership orientations can be used to aid administrative work. The second will feature a discussion with top-level female international scholars from different academic systems about the transition into academic leadership – how relationships may change, how to navigate these changes, and how one may leverage faculty skills into leadership skills. The third session will ask another set of female leaders working across disciplines and academic systems to reflect on inclusive and intersectional leadership and varied paths for future. 















WED
20 MAY

 

Opening Communication Science: ICA 2020 Hackathon

OFF-SITE | Gold Coast Hub (https://www.gchub.com.au/)

20 May; 8:00 - 16:30

There will not be a call for papers.


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OrganizersJosephine Lukito*, Jacob Fisher, Frederic Hopp, Mariken Velden 

Division/ Interest Group Affiliations: Communication Science and Biology Interest Group|Computational Methods Interest Group

Contactjlukito@wisc.edu

DescriptionAdvancing open research practices in communication is contingent upon sharing tools, ideas, skills, and data across a disparate collection of sub-fields. Although conferences and workshops are undoubtedly beneficial for pursuing these goals, they rarely afford the unstructured time and hands-on collaboration required to fully realize their potential for catalyzing open research practices. The goal of this pre-conference is to encourage open, non-competitive, collaboration across communication subfields through a two-day hands-on workshop colloquially known as a “hackathon.” During the hackathon, participants will self-organize and work together to learn new skills and solve problems of their choosing while engaging in discussions about coding, big data ethics, and reproducible research practices. Hackathons provide a collaborative, low-risk opportunity to experiment with new ideas, find potential collaborators, and to try something a little “out of the box.” We encourage participation across all experience levels, from long-time coders to those who have never used computational tools before. In addition to participating in the hackathon, attendees will also have the opportunity to organize and participate in informal breakout sessions. In these sessions, participants will learn from one another about a range of computational methods topics including introductions to widely-used coding languages like Python and R, supervised machine learning, reproducible and open practices, and blending computational analyses with other methods.

 For more information, please visit: https://www.hackingcommsci.org/


THUR
21 MAY

 

Digital Cultures of South Asia: Inequalities, Infrastructures, Informatization

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersSangeet Kumar, Denison U, USA; kumars@denison.edu Kalyani Chadha, Uof Maryland, USA; kchadha@umd.edu Radhika Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA; rparames@indiana.edu Adrian Athique, The U of Queensland, Australia; a.athique@uq.edu.au Pradip Thomas, The U of Queensland, Australia; pradip.thomas@uq.edu.au

Contactkumars@denison.edu

Division/Interest Group AffiliationActivism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Communication & Technology Division|Ethnicity & Race in Communication Division|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Intercultural Communication Division|Popular Communication Division

Description: The Digital South Asia preconference is a day-long event to support emerging research on various dimensions of digital life in the region. It will serve as an intellectual focal point for illuminating the multi-faceted contours of digital media in an important and relatively understudied territory in the Global South. Addressing the material, historical and cultural specificities of South Asia, the preconference aims to propel digital media and communication studies towards the long overdue path of de-westernization.


THUR
21 MAY

 

Digital Media in Latin America

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersPablo J. Boczkowski, Ph.D. Professor, Northwestern U, USA. Eddy Borges-Rey, Ph. D. Associate Professor, Northwestern U, Qatar. Miriam Hernandez, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, California State U- Dominguez Hills, USA Ezequiel Korin, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, U of Nevada - Reno, USA. Eugenia Mitchelstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina. Magdalena Saldaña, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile. María Celeste Wagner Ph. D. Candidate, Annenberg School for Communication, U of Pennsylvania, USA.

Division/Interest Group AffiliationJournalism Studies Division

Contactpjb9@northwestern.edu

DescriptionThis preconference aims to examine the production, distribution, and consumption of digital media in Latin America. It is a follow up to the pre-conference on Digital Journalism in Latin America that was part of the 2019 annual meeting of the International Communication Association. For this second edition, we have broadened the scope to include all digital media practices, not just journalism, to create a platform that can showcase the richness of a wider variety of relevant research in and about Latin America. Research about Latin America -and Latin American researchers- tend to be underrepresented in Communication scholarship in general, and in ICA in particular. For instance, the 2018 Conference featured only 38 papers in total about South American countries -including 15 about Brazil and 12 about Chile- and out of the hundreds of scholars who presented their work, only 21 were based in that region.

As both digital media production and consumption have featured increasingly more prominently in the information landscape of Latin America, it is worth inquiring into whether the specificity of Latin America and its culture and institutions might entail differences with digital media as it is constructed and appropriated in other parts of the world. These are some possible topics:
Latin American journalism has been described as less professionalized and less independent than in more stable democracies (de Albuquerque, 2005; Hallin and Papathanassopoulus, 2002; Hughes, 2006). How have these two long-standing features affected the practices of online news production and the self-perception of reporters?
Misinformation and fake news have become a hot topic in the region, especially during the presidential elections in Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. What factors affect the spread of false information in digital environments, and how does it compare to the spread of fake news we have observed in the Global North?
Political communication in the region has become more polarized over the past couple of years. How does this trend contrast with comparable trends in other regions of the world?
Social movements to fight gender-based violence, such as #NiUnaMenos, have embraced the potential of digital media to self-organize and have their voices heard. How do their practices and results compare to other social movements outside of Latin America?
The ongoing migration of large swaths of Latin American populations has favored the adoption of peer-to-peer networks, such as WhatsApp, and social media platforms, such as Twitter or Facebook, to maintain and actualize familial relationships and, more generally, a sense of belonging to the countries of origin in Latin America. How do these practices redefine the social dynamics, both in the country of origin and in the country of destination? How are challenges and opportunities articulated in the use of digital media among Latin American migrants?

The keynote speaker will be Ingrid Bachmann, Associate Professor in the School of Communications at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Dr. Bachmann, who has already agreed to participate in this pre-conference, specializes in issues of gender and feminist media, political communication, and news and journalism.

The planned structure for the conference is as follows:
8:30 – 9:00: Breakfast and registration
9:00 – 9:15: Introductory remarks.
9:15 – 10:30: Panel I.
10:30 – 10:45: Morning coffee break.
10:45 – 12:00: Panel II.
12:00 – 1:15: Lunch.
1:15 – 2:30: Panel III.
2:30 – 2:45: Afternoon coffee break.
2:45 – 4:00: Panel IV.
4:00 – 4:45: Keynote speaker.
4:45 – 5:00: Closing remarks.

Boczkowski and Mitchelstein have experience organizing international conferences: as co-directors of the Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina, they have organized four annual conferences with media and communication scholars from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Spain, and the United Kingdom since 2015. Boczkowski has also organized five conferences at Northwestern University over the past decade. 


THUR
21 MAY

 

Open Questions in Human-Machine Communication

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersAutumn Edwards (Western Michigan U, USA)* Eleanor Sandry (Curtin University, Australia) Andrea Guzman (Northern Illinois U, USA) Chad Edwards (Western Michigan U, USA) Steve Jones (U of Illinois at Chicago, USA) Patric Spence (U of Central Florida, USA) S. Austin Lee (Chapman U, USA) David Gunkel (Northern Illinois U, USA) Jaime Banks (Texas Tech U, USA) Seungahn Nah (U of Oregon, USA)

Division/Interest Group AffiliationHuman-Machine Communication Interest Group

Contactautumn.edwards@wmich.edu

DescriptionIn concert with the conference theme of "Open Communication," our fifth annual pre-conference on Human-Machine Communication (HMC) will explore the most pressing "open questions" surrounding communication between humans and communicative technologies, such as chatbots, social robots, and smart assistants, in order to progress theoretical and practical breakthroughs. For this full-day pre-conference, we invite scholars from across ICA's divisions and a variety of epistemological and methodological backgrounds to discuss their work in relation to HMC, which encompasses Human-Computer Interaction, Human-Robot Interaction, and Human-Agent Interaction. Scholars might raise open questions concerning the exchange of messages between people and physical or virtual digital interlocutors, the implications of integrating such technologies into people's daily lives, the repercussions of the increasing deployment of communicative machines for societies more broadly, or other pressing questions they feel HMC raises or might benefit from considering.


THUR
21 MAY

 

Intersectional Imaginaries in Media, Religion, and Culture

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:30 - 17:00

There will be a call for papers.


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OrganizersStewart M. Hoover, U of Colorado hoover@colorado.edu; Johanna Sumiala, U of Helsinki johanna.sumiala@helsinki.fi; Heidi Campbell, Texas A&M U heidic@tamu.edu; Sarah McFarland Taylor, Northwestern U smcftaylor@gmail.com; Jenna Supp-Montgomerie, U of Iowa jenna-supp-montgomerie@uiowa.edu; Corrina Laughlin, Loyola Marymount U Corrina.Laughlin@LMU.edu; Kristin Peterson, Boston College petersub@bc.edu; Andrea Press, U of Virginia apress@virginia.edu

Division/Interest Group AffiliationFeminist Scholarship Division|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Philosophy, Theory and Critique Division

Contacthoover@colorado.edu

DescriptionOn a global scale, negotiations over the expression of gender and sexuality have become central to political and social discourse and have been framed in terms of religious tradition and imagery. Some prominent examples include the debates centered around limits to contraception, transgender access to bathrooms, who may wear religious covering in public, who may marry, drive, vote, get an eduction, etc. At the same time as awareness is being raised about rampant sexual harassment and assault of women, non-white, indigenous and queer individuals, hyper-masculine leaders (Trump, Duterte, Bolsonaro) are ascending to powerful positions as they boast about sexual assault and demean female competitors. While digital media facilitate global networks of political activism related to gender justice issues as well as creative expressions of resistance, they also enable white nationalist movements, men’s rights groups, incel networks, anti-Muslim hate crimes, and the circulation of misogynistic and racist memes. Throughout these debates and conversations religion and religious symbolism are used as rhetorical touchstones and expressive performances in unexpected ways. This preconference will explore how religion and media function as dual and intertwined modalities through which identities and their various intersections are expressed or contested. We will take up questions of gender, race, sexuality, class, ability, indigeneity and the way that they are performed and understood in, through, and alongside religion and media. We welcome papers that consider religion, media, and gender as complex, multivalent categories that mutually constitute one another. And we anticipate a conversation that is global in scope and welcome projects with a focus on the Global South and indigenous contexts. The preconference will include an opening plenary session with experts in the field, including Sarah Banet-Weiser from the London School of Economics, Zala Volcic from Monash University in Australia, and Pradip Thomas from University of Queensland in Australia The remainder of the preconference will be devoted to panels made up of submitted proposals and a final roundtable discussion.

 


THUR
21 MAY

 

Taking Qualitative Methods From Good to Great: A Workshop for Students, Researchers, and Teachers

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:30 - 16:30

There will not be a call for papers.


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Organizers* Sarah J. Tracy (Sarah.Tracy@asu.edu and 480-777-1688) With support from division leadership in these five divisions: Feminist (Andrea Lee), Intercultural (Soumia Bardhan) , Language and Social Interaction (Gonen Dori-Hacohen), Organizational (Stacey Connaughton)

Division/Interest Group AffiliationFeminist Scholarship Division|Intercultural Communication Division|Interpersonal Communication Division|Language & Social Interaction Division|Organizational Communication Division

Contact: Sarah.Tracy@asu.edu

Description: In this preconference, participants will join together with colleagues across ICA divisions to workshop, practice, and learn to teach key aspects of qualitative research methods. All too often, a certain research method is isolated in only certain paradigms or focus areas of the communication discipline. This preconference, co-sponsored by five different ICA divisions, opens up space for members from various parts of the discipline, with a range of qualitative research expertise (newbies to seasoned qualitative researchers), to collaboratively workshop a phronetic (practically-wise) approach to qualitative research methods. Participants will leave the preconference with: 1) progress accomplished on their own qualitative research project, 2) worksheets and key strategies in hand that will help them continue to enhance their qualitative research and teaching, and 3) the opportunity to learn from each other about the ways that qualitative research methods are approached in various areas of the discipline. Furthermore, we will do so in a collegial environment at the main convention center, with plenty of time for conversation and networking during hosted breaks and on-site lunch.


THUR
21 MAY

 

Rethinking the Relationship between Migration, Media, and Technology in Times of Crises within and beyond the West.

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 8:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersRadhika Gajjala, Professor, American Culture Studies Program, School of Cultural and Critical Studies and Professor, School of Media and Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA. E-mail: radhik@bgsu.edu Lukasz Szulc, Lecturer in Digital Media and Society, Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield. E-mail: l.szulc@sheffield.ac.uk Emily Edwards, Graduate Assistant CCS, American Cultural Studies, PhD Student, Bowling Green State University. E-mail: eledwar@bgsu.edu Soumia Bardhan, Assistant Professor of Intercultural/International Communication, University of Colorado Denver, USA. E-mail: SOUMIA.BARDHAN@UCDENVER.EDU Amanda Paz Alencar, Assistant Professor of Media and Migration and Intercultural Communication, Erasmus University Rotterdam (Netherlands). E-mail: pazalencar@eshcc.eur.nl

Contactpazalencar@eshcc.eur.nl

Division/Interest Group AffiliationGlobal Communication and Social Change Division|Intercultural Communication Division|Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Interest Group

Description: The 21st century has been defined by a series of crises. The 2008-9 financial crisis, the so-called 2014-15 refugee crisis, and crisis of Europe post-Brexit. This period of crisis is profoundly mediated, represented through media technologies and imagined through the spectre of the migrant. In many ways, contemporary migratory movements and digital media technologies are uniquely emergent processes and structures, however, they are indelibly informed by histories of colonization. Ecological degradation, political instability, and economic marginalization resulting from histories of colonialism underscore current population displacement. Alternatively, (neo)colonial regimes have facilitated the production and proliferation of digital tools and technologies, which in turn brought significant changes to migrant mobility and integration processes.Migration is mediated through digital technologies, media structures, and assemblages. Media and migration is thus a critical nexus with which to think through themes of representation, nationalism, citizenship, governance, communication, and identity in the 21st century. Approaching the nexus of media and migration, this pre-conference examines migration, media, and technology from multiple scales, subjects, contexts and temporalities. At the same time, it strongly encourages an open discussion of the role of academics in fostering creative and effective ways to continuously engage in collaborative research initiatives that aim to bridge popular and academic debates on these timely issues. Questions and themes to consider include:• The historical relationship between media, technology, and migration. How have new digital technologies and media forms affected experiences of displacement? Historically, how have both states and migrants utilized media technologies to achieve their aims? What is the genealogy between contemporary and historical representations of migration and migrants?• The relationship between media texts, technologies, and migrants in the Global South. How are networks and migration occurring in (dis)similar ways in the Global South compared to the Global North?• How are media technologies utilized by migrants in historical and emergent cultural, civic, political, and economic contexts? What roles do media and media technologies play in the integration framework?• How have states co-opted media technologies to enact new migration and asylum regimes? What are the legacies of historic forms of technological surveillance and how are media technologies deployed to manage and construct new racial and religious divides between citizens and migrants?• What is the relationship between data and migration regimes? How is migration and asylum managed by non-state actors and institutions using digital tools and technologies?• How do media technologies enable the creation of new subjectivities and communities by migrants? What are the intersections between race, gender, sexual orientation, (im)mobility, digital space and identity and community?• To what extent and in which ways are media technologies shaping livelihoods among different migrant and refugee groups in both developed and developing regions worldwide?• How can media, migration and technology scholars contribute to enhance open communication and better understanding of global migration issues among the wider public? 
















THUR
21 MAY

 

2020 ICA Journalism Studies Graduate Student Colloquium

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:00 - 16:00

Invitation Only

Call for papers

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Organizers:  Primary Contact: Joy Kibarabara. Others: Edson Tandoc Jr.; Keren Tenenboim-Weinblatt & Seth Lewis

Division/Interest Group AffiliationJournalism Studies Division

Contactjoy.kibarabara@ims.su.se; edson@ntu.edu.sg; keren.tw@mail.huji.ac.il & sclewis@uoregon.edu

DescriptionThe Journalism Studies Graduate Student Colloquium brings together PhD candidates working in journalism studies with experienced scholars in the field. The Colloquium is part of the Journalism Studies Division‚Äö commitment to academic mentorship and will be held as preconference in conjunction with the 2020 Annual Conference of the International Communication Association in Gold Coast, Australia. Its goal is to contribute actively to the professional development of young scholars by giving them an opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and international atmosphere. Participating graduate students will receive project-specific feedback from recognized experts in the field, as well as general career development advice.















THUR
21 MAY

 

Conceptualizing a "Post-American" Internet: Technology, Governance, and Geopolitics

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersYu Hong (primary contact), Zhejiang University, China, hong1@zju.edu.cn Philipp Staab, Humboldt University, Germany, philipp.s.staab@hu-berlin.de Daya Thussu, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong SAR, dayathussu@hkbu.edu.hk

Contact hong1@zju.edu.cn

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Global Communication and Social Change Division

DescriptionThis preconference encourages focused discussion of socio-technical transformations, geopolitical reconfigurations, and institutional reactions and normative debates surrounding ICT-related governance and development in a ‘post-American’ era. In the ‘post-American’ era, internet technologies connect populations and things amidst unfixed values, contesting relations, and changing contexts. And collaboration and contestation re-work, and sometimes transcend, conventional protocols, procedures, and typologies. Conceptualizing a ‘post-American’ internet encourages scholars to delve into formative disagreement spaces, emergent geopolitical processes, and dynamic political-economic structures. 


THUR
21 MAY

 

Open Methods, Open Data

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Organizers: A/Prof Daniel Angus, Dr Timothy Graham, & Dr Ariadna Matamoros Fernandez (QUT); Dr Tobias Keller (UTZ) 

Contactdaniel.angus@qut.edu.au 

Division/ Interest Group Affiliation: Computational Methods Interest Group 

Description

We are experiencing a proliferation of new methods in communication studies, in particular those that utilise computation and digital technology. One key facet of this new methodological landscape is the presence of open source technology, workflows and data.

Open source methods and data have a rich history of use within communication research. Given the conference theme of Open Communication we see this pre-conference as the perfect opportunity to tackle the many facets of the open-source movement and its role in communication research.

This pre-conference is organised around practical instruction, panel discussions, technology demonstrations, and plenary talks from leaders and trailblazers in the open-source communication methods/data domain. We will seek to facilitate formal instruction in the use of open source techniques such as open source software and versioning systems, discuss how to manage and make use of open data, and how to develop good practices with regard to reporting methods in an open manner.

We are interested in developing a series of vibrant interactive sessions over this one-day event, and therefore seek interest from those who may wish to contribute to this pre-conference via an open call-for-papers. We encourage those wishing to contribute overviews or instruction on open source communication projects, discussions on contemporary issues in open source such as open academic publishing, and counter points to consider within the discourse of open source, to submit via this call. Note that these do need not be your own original methodological or data collections, and we encourage contributions that detail existing and popular tools and datasets.

This pre-conference will be of interest to a broad range of scholars interested in engaging with, or expanding their skills in open-source communication methods and scholarship. The objective of the pre-conference is to also raise the profile of open-source communication scholarship, to model best-practice initiatives, and build consensus amongst our community on how to continue to grow and develop the open-source communication domain.


THUR
21 MAY

 

Social Media, Algorithms, News, and Public Engagements in the Asia-Pacific and Beyond

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for papers


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OrganizersCollege of Media and International Culture, Zhejiang U Department of Communication Arts, U of Wisconsin-Madison The Annenberg School for Communication, U of Pennsylvania

Contactzhongdangpan@wisc.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication & Technology Division|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Information Systems Division|Journalism Studies Division|Mass Communication Division|Political Communication Division

Description:  Two sets of technological advances—the advent of social media and the proliferation of algorithms—are now shaping not only how information in a society is gathered, disseminated, received, and utilized, but also how we understand facts, factuality, and truths, how we are related to one another in public and as publics, and how we devise and engage in civic activities. What technology-driven innovations are emerging in the production and circulation of news? How are platforms affecting the circulation and composition of public information, including news? How might these technology-based changes be contributing to the rise of the discourse of “post-truth” and the emergence of varieties of publics? How are technological advances utilized to combat “fake news” and its dissemination? How are they deployed to innovate civic practices, ranging from the everyday to contentious engagements? In the midst of all the changes and challenges, how may we understand the challenges and possibilities of the familiar models of publics in democratic theories, namely publics who are expected to be informed, participatory, deliberative, and/or empowered?This pre-conference invites submissions of extended paper and panel proposals that examine various aspects of social media and algorithms in connection to the changing practices in news production and circulation as well as in public engagements. We hope to focus in particular on the Asia-Pacific region, but will also welcome studies of other world regions. Possible paper topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:• News and news making on social media platforms• Algorithmic curation of news and fragmentation of the public• Automated journalism in reporting contentious debates and/or protests• Using social media in producing news for civic engagement• Application of data science in news curation for social media• Visualizing data in news reporting of public issues and debates• Contestation over objectivity, factuality, and the cultural authority of journalism• Algorithmic curation and the creation of echo chambers• Algorithmically curated information environments and the rises of nativism, xenophobic nationalism, authoritarianism• AI and social media in fact checking• AI-assisted or AI-enabled authoritarian demagoguery• Social media, AI, and counter-cultural practices• Social media and innovations in collective action  
















THUR
21 MAY

 

DIgital REsearch, Translated (DIREcT)

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:30 - 16:30

Call for Papers/More Information


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OrganizersJessica Taylor Piotrowski*, Mark Johnson, & Anna Potter

Contact: j.piotrowski@uva.nl (*), markrjohnsongames@gmail.com, APotter@usc.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation:  Children, Adolescents & the Media Division|Game Studies Division

DescriptionOpen science reflects more than accessible data files and open access publications. To truly practice bring OPEN, it is imperative that scholars and media practitioners break down the institutional walls that often separate them in order to share ideas, innovative thinking, good practices, and more. The aim of this preconference is to practice openness by facilitating a DIREcT dialogue between digital media creators and the scholars that study digital media.


THUR
21 MAY

 

From the rise of alternative media to the (dis)engagement of MSM: making sense of the new political news environment and its audiences

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:30 - 17:30

Call for Papers


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Organizers: Primary contact: *Karoline Andrea Ihlebæk, Associate Professor at Oslo Metropolitan University, ihlebaek@oslomet.no, +4791560837.Tine Ustad Figenschou, Professor at Oslo Metropolitan University. Scott Wright, Associate Professor at University of Melbourne.Stephen Cushion, Professor at Cardiff University.

Contactihlebaek@oslomet.no

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Journalism Studies Division|Political Communication Division

DescriptionOver recent decades, many countries have seen emerging online and social media platforms offering alternative political agendas to the mainstream media. In the US and Europe, the rise of right-wing sites has received particular attention (Benkler, Faris and Roberts 2018), but both left-wing and right-wing counter media have become prominent sources of news for particular user groups around the world (Zhang 2016). Left-wing alternative media is commonly motivated by anti-globalization and anti-capitalism perspectives, while right-wing media focus on anti-immigration or anti-Islam sentiments (Atton 2001, Holt 2019). In common for many alternative media sites, however, is the focus on media criticism and anti-establishment, challenging media power and the communicative authority of established news media (Carlson 2017, Figenschou and Ihlebæk 2019). At the same time, there are signs that some publics have become increasingly disengaged with established media, causing increased polarization of news audiences and growing mistrust towards professional journalism’ self-declared neutral, objective, balanced and impartial approach to reporting politics (Fletcher 2019). The acronym ‘MSM’ has become a widely used pejorative term to describe mainstream/established media, but it is often invoked in different ways to criticize how the media represent the interests of elites and perpetuate the political status quo. As we have seen a rise in alternative media and a disengagement with MSM, a new political environment is fast evolving, prompting questions about how people are being informed about politics and public affairs, and the consequences of audiences relying on news that is consistent with their own ideological perspectives.In this one-day ICA pre-conference, we welcome papers that will explore the phenomenon of alternative media and MSM (dis)engagement, including both theoretical and empirical contributions, that focus on issues such as:Production and professionalization. Research has pointed out how the boundaries between alternative and professional journalism can be difficult to draw, in particular as alternative media professionalize, pointing to the need for theoretical and conceptual developments of how to draw the distinctions (Holt, Figenschou and Frischlich 2019). We invite papers that highlight how the ongoing boundary-work between alternative media and the mainstream media is constructed and negotiated. In other words, what characterizes mainstream media and alternative media relations?Audiences of alternative media. Audiences of alternative media should not automatically be denounced as misguided or passive ‘populist’ media users. Recent studies show that such audiences can be highly engaged media consumers that to a varying degree express distrust to journalists or the establishment (Noppari, Hiltunen and Ahva 2018; Schulz 2019). However, we still know too little about the gratification and motivation of these media users, and thus encourage papers that explore the ideological, political and affective dimensions of alternative media engagement.News, information and opinions. Research has demonstrated how the content of alternative media is ideologically driven and often blurs the divide between news and views (Nygaard 2019). But the content on alternative media sites are still strikingly unexplored, particularly visual analysis, largescale content analysis and network studies. We welcome papers that systematically examine the content of alternative media, as well as research that compares news agendas with mainstream media.Cross-national studies and research from the Global South. While the US and Europe has long been the focus of academic and popular debates, the rise of alternative media in other media systems and political cultures have brought new types of ideologically-driven news sites. We invite comparative papers that, for example, compare cross-national differences in the production, content and users of alternative media, along with how the MSM has been characterized across countries. We therefore strongly encourage research that focuses on the southern hemisphere and/or non-democratic contexts.We are in discussion with relevant journals for a special issue on new developments in alternative media and political disengagement. If successful, submissions for the conference will be considered and full papers invited in September 2020. 




































THUR
21 MAY

 

Opportunities, Tensions, and Challenges of Global Higher Education

OFF-SITEBond U

21 May; 8:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Contactmmitchel@bond.edu.au

Division/Interest Group AffiliationInstructional and Developmental Communication Division

DescriptionGlobal higher education has welcomed international students to study overseas and provided fertile ground for the burgeoning of international campuses and other forms of culturally hybrid institutions. These changes open the quest for new pedagogies able to effectively combine Western, in particular Anglo-Saxon, pedagogical traditions with the expectations and sensitivities of students from Asia. The main objective of the pre/conference is to offer a forum of discussion about the future of global higher education.



THUR
21 MAY

 

Opening up the meanings of "the professional": professional work and professionalism in communication studies

OFF-SITE Bond U

21 May; 8:00 - 16:30

Call for Papers


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Bus from Bond University to the Convention Center

OrganizersKirstie McAllum* and Frédérik Matte 

Contactkirstie.mcallum@umontreal.ca

Division/Interest Group AffiliationOrganizational Communication Division

DescriptionGiven the number of occupations claiming and resisting professionalization, this preconference aims to stimulate dialogue about how communication scholarship can open up research on new forms of professionalism. Building on Ashcraft and Cheney’s (2007) landmark text on “the professional,” we foreground and celebrate the multi-faceted nature of professionalism as an “essentially contested concept,” characterized by internal complexity, conceptual diversity, and reciprocal recognition of the concept’s contested character among contending parties.


THUR
21 MAY

 

11th Annual Doctoral Consortium of the Communication and Technology Division, co-sponsored by the Mobile Communication Interest Group

OFF-SITE | TBD

21 May; 8:30 - 16:00

There will be a call for papers

Invitation Only

Read more

Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersKaty Pearce, University of Washington, USA (Co-director) Jordan Frith, Clemson University, USA (Co-director) Marjolijn Antheunis, Tilburg University, Netherlands (Steering Committee member) Veronika Karnowski, Ludwig Maximillian University, Germany (Steering Committee member) German Neubaum, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany (Steering Committee member) Chrissy Cook, Tilburg University, Netherlands (Student rep, assistant)

Contactkepearce@uw.edu (primary contact) jfrith@clemson.edu , M.L.Antheunis@uvt.nl veronika.karnowski@ifkw

Division/Interest Group AffiliationCommunication & Technology Division|Mobile Communication Interest Group

DescriptionThe consortium will bring together PhD candidates conducting research on various types of communication technologies and mobile communication to give them the opportunity to present and discuss their research in a constructive and international atmosphere. The objectives of the event are to provide feedback and advice to participating PhD candidates on their in-progress research thesis. Moreover, the doctoral consortium will provide the opportunity to meet experts as well as fellow PhD candidates from different backgrounds working on related topics.


THUR
21 MAY

 

Visual Representation and Marginality: Opening New Conversations

OFF-SITECrown Plaza Surfers Paradise (2807 Gold Coast Hwy, Surfers Paradise QLD 4217)

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers*Dr T.J. Thomson, Queensland U of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Contacttj.thomson@qut.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Ethnicity & Race in Communication Division|Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Interest Group|Visual Communication Studies Division

Description

In 2020, ICA travels to the antipodes in Australia, home of the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and, in doing so, presents a unique opportunity to understand how visual representation at the margins has been understood by different groups, for different purposes, and in different ways over time. The visual representation of marginalized groups has tended to be shaped by dominant groups. Because images are so powerful, memorable and emotionally charged, such representations have historically worked to perpetuate hierarchies, stereotypes and barriers to full participation in the public sphere. De-marginalizing communities, therefore, requires that we investigate the role of visual communication in oppression and liberation. Before pathways can be opened for improved communication, it is necessary to understand the obstacles of the past. In the digital age, participation in the visual public sphere is as critical as ever to the human condition. The notions of visuality and visibility, too, and the interplay between them, are other key considerations this pre-conference hopes to encourage discussion on, as the struggle for visibility often involves images politics and is inherently connected to marginality, counter-hegemony, resistance, and advocacy. These phenomena can take visual form as images but can also transcend them and manifest more broadly as material culture, performativity, bodily expressions of identity, etc. We conceptualize visual broadly, “from dreams and cognitive theory through gesture and geography, as well as issues concerning visual ethics, visual ecology, representation, visual media in all forms, and visual behavior.”

Full details are available at: https://forms.gle/z1kPHgMezcHvSyZG9

THUR
21 MAY

 

Journalism, Aid and Development in the Global South

OFF-SITEG14 1.13B ,Griffith U (Gold Coast Campus)

21 May; 8:30 - 17:00

There will not be a call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDr Mel Bunce (City, U of London) and Dr David Nolan (U  of Melbourne)

Contactmelanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk; d.nolan@unimelb.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Global Communication and Social Change Division

Description:

This one day pre-conference brings together researchers and practitioners to critically examine aid and journalism in the Global South. Specifically, it looks at the governments, philanthropists and charitable groups that fund journalism about development and humanitarian issues. 

The day includes keynotes from invited speakers in research, journalism and media-funding. It also includes interactive workshop sessions, in which all attendees are welcome to contribute. These sessions examine the impact of aid on global news content, and consider potential avenues for supporting and improving future coverage.

Registration is $30 US, which covers lunch and refreshments. The number of attendees will be capped to allow time for interaction and conversation.

We will send further details of lineup and speakers in the coming months to registered attendees.


















THUR
21 MAY

 

Visual Politics: Image Production, Perception, and Influence

Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre

21 May; 9:00 - 16:00

Call for Papers


Read more

 

OrganizersErik Bucy (Texas Tech, USA), Cristian Vaccari (Loughborough, UK)

Contact:  erik.bucy@ttu.edu, c.vaccari@lboro.ac.uk

Division/Interest Group AffiliationPolitical Communication Division|Visual Communication Studies Division

Description:Images are ubiquitous in contemporary politics. From television coverage of campaigns and elections to visual memes and images of leaders circulated on social media, visual portrayals shape perceptions of the political world. As efficient carriers of social and symbolic information, they are quickly assessed, rapidly judged, and readily remembered—even when manipulated or released as deepfakes. Despite growing evidence of influence, visuals remain understudied within media politics. This preconference brings together visual scholars from different research traditions and international perspectives to present state of the art studies of image production, perception, and influence in the contemporary political landscape.



POSTCONFERENCES


TUES
26 MAY

International Stories: Building Relationships that Bridge Nations

OFF-SITE | U of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney [Kensington]

26 May | 8:00 - 17:00

Call for papers

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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersPrimary Organiser: Michael L. Kent, Professor U of New South Wales. MichaelLKent@gmail.com Local Cell: 0403 528 130 International syntax: (+61) 403 528 130 Secondary Organiser Maureen Taylor, Professor, ICA Fellow U of Technology Sydney

ContactMichaelLKent@Gmail.com

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Public Relations Division

DescriptionThis will be a collaboration between the University of New South Wales and several Chinese universities and public relations organisations (above). The conference will be the "The 5th Annual Conference of the Public Relations Society of China" and "The 13th International Forum on Public Relations and Advertising." As planning moves forward, we will be reaching out to the local public relations associations such as ANZCA, as well as the ICA Public Relations division.

 


TUES
26 MAY

Digital Platform Regulation: Beyond Transparency and Openness

OFF-SITE |  Griffith U Gold Coast Campus

26 May; 8:30 - 17:00 

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Terry Flew

Contactt.flew@qut.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication Law & Policy Division|Media Industry Studies Interest Group

Description: As online activities and experiences are increasingly mediated through digital platforms, a series of scandals and ‘public shocks’ (Ananny & Gillespie, 2017) have raised concerns about privacy and security, the misuse of user data, algorithmic biases, and the public distribution of objectionable and sometimes abhorrent content through the internet (Flew, Martin, & Suzor, 2019). Legislators and regulators in many countries are now engaged in public enquiries and the development of new laws to apply public interest standards to digital platforms, as First Amendment arguments about freedom of online expression and claims that the platforms are simply intermediaries are increasingly under challenge (Napoli, 2019). Leading scholars have identified digital platforms as being central to 21st century communication and media policy (Just & Puppis, 2018; Picard & Pickard, 2017), and debates about the relationship between individual rights and social responsibilities for digital platforms have been noticeably shifting from the quasi-libertarian logics of only a decade ago (Gillespie, 2018).At the same time, there is a lack of consensus about what digital platform regulation could, or should involve. It is unclear, for instance, whether it should involve a refining of existing forms of communications and media policy to incorporate the role now played by digital platforms as quasi-publishers of increasingly popular digital media content, or whether the principal issues such as monopoly power and consumer protection are best addressed by variants of economic policy e.g. proposals to treat digital platforms as ‘information fiduciaries’ in their handling of user data (Balkin, 2018; Dobkin, 2018). The balance between nation-state regulation and supranational governance is also a subject of considerable debate, as is the extent to which ‘soft law’, and platform-brokered arrangements such as the Twitter Trust & Safety Council and the proposed Facebook Oversight board may substitute for nation-state regulation. At a time of growing tensions among leading world powers, the divergence between forms of internet governance, and the possibility of a global ‘splinternet’ also needs to be considered (Mueller, 2017).This proposed ICA post-conference will bring together academics, activists and policy-makers from a number of countries. Among those who have indicated a willingness to participate are Kristyna Rozgonyi (U. Vienna), Amanda Lotz (QUT), Victor Pickard (Annenberg U. Penn), Dwayne Winseck (Carleton U.), David Hesmondhalgh (U. Leeds), Josef Trappel (U. Salzburg), Sandra Braman (TAMU), Ramon Lobato (RMIT), Sora Park (U. Cambera), and Stuart Cunningham (QUT).The event will be supported by the Australian Research Council, QUT Digital Media Research Centre, Griffith Unviersity Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Communications Law & Policy Division of the ICA, Media Industries Interest Group of the ICA.In addition to academic presentations, we are looking to convene a lunch-time policy-makers forum, with representatives of the Australian Communication and Media Authority (ACMA), Deaprtment of Communcition and the Arts, the Office of the eSafety Commissioner, and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).Publication outcomes are under consideration including a special issue of the journal Global Perspectves on “Trust in the Digital Economy”, to be edited by Terry Flew and Sora Park. 









 


TUES
26 MAY

Strengthening Communication for Social Justice through Education and Research

OFF-SITE The Women’s College of the University of Queensland

26 May | 9:00 - 17:00

Program Information

Call for Papers


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Guided self-transportation

Organizers: • Pradip Thomas, U of Queensland• Elske van de Fliert, U of Queensland• Karin Wilkins, U of Miami• Silvio Waisbord, George Washington U• Jo Tacchi, Loughborough U• Thomas Tufte, Loughborough U

Contactkwilkins@miami.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Public Diplomacy Interest Group

Description: Communication for social change has been building as a significant focus for academic programs around the world. An underlying motivation for this event is to create a network of those associated with existing and emerging degree and certificate programs, to strengthen our educational and scholarly initiatives. We will engage dialogue concerning experiences and aspirations in supporting critical scholarship in communication and advocating for social justice.

 


WED
27 MAY

Openness in Communication: Relationships, Organizations and Institutions

OFF-SITE | U of Technology Sydney (UTS), Broadway Campus 15 Broadway, Ultimo NSW 2007

https://www.uts.edu.au/about/about-our-campus/our-campus

27 May | 9:00 - 16:30

Call for papers


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UTS is located next to the Central bus and train station. There is easy public transportation from the SYD airport. There are a dozen hotels, hostels and apartments within walking distance of UTS

 

OrganizersMaureen Taylor Maureen.taylor-1@UTS.edu.au Jim Macnamara jim.macnamara@UTS.edu.au School of Communication U of Technology Sydney Mitchell Hobbs mitchell.hobbs@sydney.edu.au Department of Media and Communications The U of Sydney Maureen Taylor, Jim Macnammara, Mitchell Hobbs

ContactMaureen.taylor-1@UTS.edu.au, Jim Macnamara jim.macnamara@UTS.edu.au, mitchell.hobbs@sydney.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Organizational Communication Division|Public Relations Division

DescriptionOpenness has been offered as a guiding framework across a variety of interpersonal, organizational and public relations contexts. At face level, open communication can be considered a positive process that benefits people, organizations and society. But, openness has been critiqued (Eisenberg & Witten, 1987). Openness does not offer a panacea for personal or organizational communication, which is particularly pertinent in an age of concerns about privacy and the use of personal data. Being open may be contingent, which leads to questions about what, when, and how should communication be open. This post conference considers openness from diverse disciplinary perspectives.

  

 

 

 

 


WED
27 MAY

Community and alternative media in the face of disruptions

OFF-SITEThe Ship Inn, historic Brisbane venue on the Southbank of the Brisbane River. Griffith U Southbank Campus, Brisbane (the Ship Inn Function Room is part of Griffith U)

27 May | 9:30 - 17:00

There will be a call for papers.


Read more

In addition, and for ICA delegates traveling to and from the Gold Coast for the postconference in Brisbane, we will offer a shuttle bus – costs to be covered by the Griffith Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Griffith University (research institute of the co-organiser of this post-conference, Prof Susan Forde).The venue is also very well served by public transport within Brisbane, and between Brisbane and the Gold Coast for ICA delegates.All registered participants will be provided with information on transport and accommodation options close to Southbank, Brisbane 

OrganizersProfessor Susan Forde, Griffith University and Dr Tanja Dreher, University of New South Wales

Contactt.dreher@unsw.edu.au; s.forde@griffith.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Ethnicity & Race in Communication Division

Description: From rapidly changing technologies to the rise of social media, from the precarious state of journalism and failing business models for commercial media to the resurgence of white supremacy and authoritarian rule, community and alternative media face multiple ‘disruptions’. While the 21st century media environment offers increasing opportunities for ‘voice’, the challenges for radical, dissenting or alternative media are practical, political and fundamental. This postconference will bring together engaged scholars to explore the challenges and opportunities for community and alternative media at a time of unprecedented change.
Australia has a 40+ year history of publicly-funded, volunteer-run community broadcasting that serves as a benchmark for developments around the world. Despite chronic funding pressures, the sector is a platform for diverse and dissenting voices, including an extensive network of First Nations media, ethnic community media, radical radio, women of colour collectives, media by and for people with disability, prisoners’ radio, alternative journalism and much more. This postconference will include invited practitioner panels to showcase key local community and alternative media organisations, including the Brisbane Indigenous Media Association, Radio 4EB Community Ethnic Radio; and 4ZZZ FM Community Radio. These outlets, in the digital media environment, extend well beyond their standard ‘radio’ programming to new forms of media communication -- podcasting, live web streaming, social media accounts and news feeds, announcer blogs, and so on.
Key questions to be explored include:
- How do community and alternative media enable voices that are marginalized or excluded from the ‘mainstream’ to be heard – what can we learn (or not) from their practices?
- What is the role and value of established ‘community’ media when social media platforms enable a proliferation of voice?
- What is the state of news and current affairs – including news journalisms and issues-based talks programming – at a time of both technological and professional ‘disruption’?
- What does ‘community’ or ‘alternative’ media mean in the context of multiple ‘disruptions’?
The postconference welcomes participation from researchers and practitioners across community and alternative media very broadly defined – including activist media, the community broadcasting sector, community media interventions, alternative journalism, citizens media and more.
Selected papers will be considered for a themed issue of the Journal of Community and Alternative Media, of which Professor Susan Forde is the Co-Editor (with Professor Chris Atton, Edinburgh Napier University, UK). 

 

 


WED
27 MAY

The 18th Chinese Internet Research Conference: The internationalisation of China’s digital and communication industries

OFF-SITERMIT U 124 La Trobe St Melbourne VIC 3004 Australia

27 May | 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Participants must secure their own air and ground transportation and lodging. We will provide recommendations and assistance. Some travel funding assistance will be provided.

OrganizersHaiqing Yu haiqing.yu@rmit.edu.au* Larissa Hjorth larissa.hjorth@rmit.edu.au Stuart Cunningham s.cunningham@qut.edu.au David Craig davidcra@usc.edu Michael Keane m.keane@curtin.edu.au Jian Xu j.xu@deakin.edu.au Mathew Allen hos-cca@deakin.edu.au

Contacthaiqing.yu@rmit.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s):Global Communication and Social Change Division|Media Industry Studies Interest Group|Popular Communication Division

Description:In anticipation of an Asian century (Khanna, 2019), Chinese technology has become increasingly more assertive (Lee, 2018) if approximating a tech cold war. China’s internationalization strategies of their digital and communication industries are systematic and comprehensive as evidenced by their artificial intelligence ambitions and the “Digital Silk Road Initiative” (Shen, 2018: Fung et al, 2018; Keane & Yu, 2019; Shi, 2018). These policy interventions have helped advance Chinese tech, media, and digital platforms “over the wall”, if more often through parallel platform strategies, whether social media platforms (WeChat, Kuaishou, Douyin/TikTok), E-commerce models and online payment (Alipay, AliExpress, ‘Taobao Village’), digital and mobile technology (Xiaomi, Huawei), or its big data industry.Yet, while promising a ‘fairer’ Internet and a ‘cyber community of shared destiny’ (to use Chinese President Xi’s words), these policies promote the interests of Chinese cyber sovereignty, if an alternative cyber order advanced by the Chinese Internet (Yang, 2003, 2012). China’s expansion of its digital footprint, advance in digital capacity and AI technology, and soft power ambition have caused unease among international competitors and are regarded as ‘threat’ by the US-led ‘Western’ alliance, as witnessed in the Huawei 5G ban in the U.S and Australia, forced sale of the gay dating app Grindr in the US, and accusation of TikTok violations of cultural norms and regulatory policies in India, Malaysia, and the U.S. Even as China’s media content has flourished domestically and among the Chinese diasporas, efforts to enter Western mainstream geo-cultural markets have proven challenging if not impossible (Sun 2015), even with more genre-driven fare (The Wandering Earth) or the delayed “soft launch” of video portals (Lotz 2019) like IQiyi into southeast Asian markets.To this end, CIRC 2020 proposes to interrogate questions around, but not limited to, the following topics:• China’s digital strategy and expansion along the Belt and Road Initiatives;• The role of the Internet and digital technologies (artificial intelligence, blockchain, big data, quantum, etc) in shaping and promoting the Chinese version of a new cyber order, both within and outside China;• The role of the Internet and digital diplomacy in the great power contest;• Chinese digital media and diasporic Chinese communities• Diasporic Chinese media in the digital era• Chinese media going out in the digital era• China’s soft power in the digital era• China’s digital capitalists and corporations in promoting China’s digital power and digital order• China’s cyber diplomacy• China’s Cybersecurity Law and its national and global impact• China’s World Internet Conference and its global impact• Chinese approach of global Internet governance• Chinese notion of cybersovereignty• China’s E-commerce companies go global• Chinese mobile apps go global• China as a global cybersecurity threat? (e.g. Huawei 5G ban)• Chinese digital cosmopolitanism and its global impact• Chinese digital authoritarianism and its global impact• China and global digital economy• Comparative studies between China and other nations on digital economies, politics, policies, governance, platforms, activism and cultures 
























WED
27 MAY

International Cultures of Journalism Conference: ICJ2020

OFF-SITEU of Technology Sydney (UTS)

27 May | 8:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers 


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Prof Saba Bebawi

Contactsaba.bebawi@uts.edu.au

Description:The conference aims to spur an engaged scholarly debate on how different cultures of journalism become distinctly visible across the world. Though journalism is usually taught and practiced through a traditional model developed in the West, the routines and conventions of journalism have distinctive meanings in the non-Western context. For an effective practice of journalism, there is a need to develop a model that will sit outside the long-established Western paradigm and reflect better national contexts. Therefore, this conference offers an international and intercultural environment for academics, researchers, journalists and postgraduate students to exchange and share research results and experiences about the various cultures of journalism. The conference will include paper and panel presentations, well-known keynote speakers, who include Professor Barbie Zelizer and Professor Hugo de Burgh, and dinner. Please see website for the conference: https://www.uts.edu.au/icj2020


WED
27 MAY

Digital Inequalities and Emerging Technologies: Regimes, Spaces and Imaginaries

OFF-SITEU of Sydney, Room S226, Level 2, Department of Media and Communications, John Woolley Building (A20),

27 May | 8:30 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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The U of Sydney is a short walk from Central and Redfern stations and very centrally located with excellent transport links. We expect that attendees of ICA will be using Sydney as a gateway point to return home. While we will include an indicative price ($100-120AUD) for flights from the Gold Coast to Sydney to attendees, travel costs to the conference will need to be covered by individual attendees.

OrganizersJustine Humphry, U of Sydney; Sora Park, U of Canberra; Sharon Strover, U of Texas-Austin; Teresa Swist, Western Sydney U; Danielle Wyatt, U of Melbourne

Contact: justine.humphry@sydney.edu.au; sora.park@canberra.edu.au ; sharon.strover@austin.utexas.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s):Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Communication & Technology Division

Description: Problems of digital exclusion have traditionally been associated with lack of access to technology. Increasingly digital exclusion also emerges with the active agency of state and corporate institutions using AI, smart city infrastructures, surveillance systems and even robotics. The aim of this post-conference is to make connections between a diverse range of disciplinary areas that have studied digital inequalities including digital inclusion research, data justice, critical race and digital media studies, data sovereignty and digital rights.

Inequalities occur along multiple fronts including geography, social class, race, gender, age, and institutional systems and policies. They also can be shaped by powerful imaginaries of digitally-enabled futures promising efficiency, safety and economic prosperity. Data-driven and algorithmic processes related to smart technologies, artificial intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), facial-recognition and robotics demand an extension from traditional concerns around digital exclusion to account for the potential to produce systemic abuses and extenuate disadvantage.

The post-conference is an opportunity to examine the ways in which new technologies, including those that link digital networks and data via tracking tools and algorithms, add to the unequal distribution of digital benefits and perpetuate and even worsen inequalities in the expansion of the Digital Welfare State and other kinds of neoliberal, policing and techno-centric systems. It also examines the kinds of civic, open and public institutions – such as libraries, local governments, community media, and justice movements – that are increasingly important for ameliorating digital inequalities and countering imaginaries premised upon techno-centric fixes.

The post-conference will include keynote speaker Professor Esther Hargittai, U of Zurich. Please see Call For Papers for more details.