ICA 2020 - Pre and Postconferences
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Pre/postconferences for ICA's 2020 Annual Conference will be held virtually from 20 May to 26 May.
Registrations for pre/postconferences are now available below.
The pre/postconference registration deadline is 18 May, 12:00 Noon Office Time.


PRECONFERENCES


Digital Cultures of South Asia: Inequalities, Infrastructures, Informatization

Virtual Conference via Zoom

21 May; 8:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers

Program


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OrganizersSangeet Kumar, Denison U, USA; kumars@denison.edu Kalyani Chadha, Uof Maryland, USA; kchadha@umd.edu Radhika Parameswaran, Indiana U, USA; rparames@indiana.edu Adrian Athique, The U of Queensland, Australia; a.athique@uq.edu.au Pradip Thomas, The U of Queensland, Australia; pradip.thomas@uq.edu.au

Contactkumars@denison.edu

Division/Interest Group AffiliationActivism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Communication & Technology Division|Ethnicity & Race in Communication Division|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Intercultural Communication Division|Popular Communication Division

Description: The Digital South Asia preconference is a day-long event to support emerging research on various dimensions of digital life in the region. It will serve as an intellectual focal point for illuminating the multi-faceted contours of digital media in an important and relatively understudied territory in the Global South. Addressing the material, historical and cultural specificities of South Asia, the preconference aims to propel digital media and communication studies towards the long overdue path of de-westernization.


Digital Media in Latin America

ICA Virtual Conference Platform with vFairs

The Digital Media in Latin America Pre-Conference will mostly take place asynchronously through the ICA site. Nonetheless, registered participants at the Pre-Conference will also be able to join live Q&A sessions through Zoom during May 21, 9:00-12:05 (California Time). For more information, email icapreconflatam@gmail.com

21 May - 26 May

Call for Papers


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OrganizersPablo J. Boczkowski, Ph.D. Professor, Northwestern U, USA. Eddy Borges-Rey, Ph. D. Associate Professor, Northwestern U, Qatar. Miriam Hernandez, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, California State U- Dominguez Hills, USA Ezequiel Korin, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, U of Nevada - Reno, USA. Eugenia Mitchelstein, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, Universidad de San Andrés, Argentina. Magdalena Saldaña, Ph. D. Assistant Professor, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile. María Celeste Wagner Ph. D. Candidate, Annenberg School for Communication, U of Pennsylvania, USA.

Division/Interest Group AffiliationJournalism Studies Division

Contactpjb9@northwestern.edu

DescriptionThis preconference aims to examine the production, distribution, and consumption of digital media in Latin America. It is a follow up to the pre-conference on Digital Journalism in Latin America that was part of the 2019 annual meeting of the International Communication Association. For this second edition, we have broadened the scope to include all digital media practices, not just journalism, to create a platform that can showcase the richness of a wider variety of relevant research in and about Latin America. Research about Latin America -and Latin American researchers- tend to be underrepresented in Communication scholarship in general, and in ICA in particular. For instance, the 2018 Conference featured only 38 papers in total about South American countries -including 15 about Brazil and 12 about Chile- and out of the hundreds of scholars who presented their work, only 21 were based in that region.

As both digital media production and consumption have featured increasingly more prominently in the information landscape of Latin America, it is worth inquiring into whether the specificity of Latin America and its culture and institutions might entail differences with digital media as it is constructed and appropriated in other parts of the world. These are some possible topics:
Latin American journalism has been described as less professionalized and less independent than in more stable democracies (de Albuquerque, 2005; Hallin and Papathanassopoulus, 2002; Hughes, 2006). How have these two long-standing features affected the practices of online news production and the self-perception of reporters?
Misinformation and fake news have become a hot topic in the region, especially during the presidential elections in Mexico, Chile, and Brazil. What factors affect the spread of false information in digital environments, and how does it compare to the spread of fake news we have observed in the Global North?
Political communication in the region has become more polarized over the past couple of years. How does this trend contrast with comparable trends in other regions of the world?
Social movements to fight gender-based violence, such as #NiUnaMenos, have embraced the potential of digital media to self-organize and have their voices heard. How do their practices and results compare to other social movements outside of Latin America?
The ongoing migration of large swaths of Latin American populations has favored the adoption of peer-to-peer networks, such as WhatsApp, and social media platforms, such as Twitter or Facebook, to maintain and actualize familial relationships and, more generally, a sense of belonging to the countries of origin in Latin America. How do these practices redefine the social dynamics, both in the country of origin and in the country of destination? How are challenges and opportunities articulated in the use of digital media among Latin American migrants?

The keynote speaker will be Ingrid Bachmann, Associate Professor in the School of Communications at Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile. Dr. Bachmann, who has already agreed to participate in this pre-conference, specializes in issues of gender and feminist media, political communication, and news and journalism.

The planned structure for the conference is as follows:
8:30 – 9:00: Breakfast and registration
9:00 – 9:15: Introductory remarks.
9:15 – 10:30: Panel I.
10:30 – 10:45: Morning coffee break.
10:45 – 12:00: Panel II.
12:00 – 1:15: Lunch.
1:15 – 2:30: Panel III.
2:30 – 2:45: Afternoon coffee break.
2:45 – 4:00: Panel IV.
4:00 – 4:45: Keynote speaker.
4:45 – 5:00: Closing remarks.

Boczkowski and Mitchelstein have experience organizing international conferences: as co-directors of the Center for the Study of Media and Society in Argentina, they have organized four annual conferences with media and communication scholars from the United States, Canada, Mexico, Colombia, Brazil, Chile, Argentina, Spain, and the United Kingdom since 2015. Boczkowski has also organized five conferences at Northwestern University over the past decade. 


Open Questions in Human-Machine Communication

ICA Virtual Conference Platform with vFairs

20 May - 26 May

Call for Papers


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OrganizersAutumn Edwards (Western Michigan U, USA)* Eleanor Sandry (Curtin University, Australia) Andrea Guzman (Northern Illinois U, USA) Chad Edwards (Western Michigan U, USA) Steve Jones (U of Illinois at Chicago, USA) Patric Spence (U of Central Florida, USA) S. Austin Lee (Chapman U, USA) David Gunkel (Northern Illinois U, USA) Jaime Banks (Texas Tech U, USA) Seungahn Nah (U of Oregon, USA)

Division/Interest Group AffiliationHuman-Machine Communication Interest Group

Contactautumn.edwards@wmich.edu

DescriptionIn concert with the conference theme of "Open Communication," our fifth annual pre-conference on Human-Machine Communication (HMC) will explore the most pressing "open questions" surrounding communication between humans and communicative technologies, such as chatbots, social robots, and smart assistants, in order to progress theoretical and practical breakthroughs. For this full-day pre-conference, we invite scholars from across ICA's divisions and a variety of epistemological and methodological backgrounds to discuss their work in relation to HMC, which encompasses Human-Computer Interaction, Human-Robot Interaction, and Human-Agent Interaction. Scholars might raise open questions concerning the exchange of messages between people and physical or virtual digital interlocutors, the implications of integrating such technologies into people's daily lives, the repercussions of the increasing deployment of communicative machines for societies more broadly, or other pressing questions they feel HMC raises or might benefit from considering.


Rethinking the Relationship between Migration, Media, and Technology in Times of Crises within and beyond the West.

ICA Virtual Conference Platform with vFairs

20 May - 26 May

Call for Papers


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OrganizersRadhika Gajjala, Professor, American Culture Studies Program, School of Cultural and Critical Studies and Professor, School of Media and Communication, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio, USA. E-mail: radhik@bgsu.edu Lukasz Szulc, Lecturer in Digital Media and Society, Sociological Studies, University of Sheffield. E-mail: l.szulc@sheffield.ac.uk Emily Edwards, Graduate Assistant CCS, American Cultural Studies, PhD Student, Bowling Green State University. E-mail: eledwar@bgsu.edu Soumia Bardhan, Assistant Professor of Intercultural/International Communication, University of Colorado Denver, USA. E-mail: SOUMIA.BARDHAN@UCDENVER.EDU Amanda Paz Alencar, Assistant Professor of Media and Migration and Intercultural Communication, Erasmus University Rotterdam (Netherlands). E-mail: pazalencar@eshcc.eur.nl

Contactpazalencar@eshcc.eur.nl

Division/Interest Group AffiliationGlobal Communication and Social Change Division|Intercultural Communication Division|Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Interest Group

Description: The 21st century has been defined by a series of crises. The 2008-9 financial crisis, the so-called 2014-15 refugee crisis, and crisis of Europe post-Brexit. This period of crisis is profoundly mediated, represented through media technologies and imagined through the spectre of the migrant. In many ways, contemporary migratory movements and digital media technologies are uniquely emergent processes and structures, however, they are indelibly informed by histories of colonization. Ecological degradation, political instability, and economic marginalization resulting from histories of colonialism underscore current population displacement. Alternatively, (neo)colonial regimes have facilitated the production and proliferation of digital tools and technologies, which in turn brought significant changes to migrant mobility and integration processes.Migration is mediated through digital technologies, media structures, and assemblages. Media and migration is thus a critical nexus with which to think through themes of representation, nationalism, citizenship, governance, communication, and identity in the 21st century. Approaching the nexus of media and migration, this pre-conference examines migration, media, and technology from multiple scales, subjects, contexts and temporalities. At the same time, it strongly encourages an open discussion of the role of academics in fostering creative and effective ways to continuously engage in collaborative research initiatives that aim to bridge popular and academic debates on these timely issues. Questions and themes to consider include:• The historical relationship between media, technology, and migration. How have new digital technologies and media forms affected experiences of displacement? Historically, how have both states and migrants utilized media technologies to achieve their aims? What is the genealogy between contemporary and historical representations of migration and migrants?• The relationship between media texts, technologies, and migrants in the Global South. How are networks and migration occurring in (dis)similar ways in the Global South compared to the Global North?• How are media technologies utilized by migrants in historical and emergent cultural, civic, political, and economic contexts? What roles do media and media technologies play in the integration framework?• How have states co-opted media technologies to enact new migration and asylum regimes? What are the legacies of historic forms of technological surveillance and how are media technologies deployed to manage and construct new racial and religious divides between citizens and migrants?• What is the relationship between data and migration regimes? How is migration and asylum managed by non-state actors and institutions using digital tools and technologies?• How do media technologies enable the creation of new subjectivities and communities by migrants? What are the intersections between race, gender, sexual orientation, (im)mobility, digital space and identity and community?• To what extent and in which ways are media technologies shaping livelihoods among different migrant and refugee groups in both developed and developing regions worldwide?• How can media, migration and technology scholars contribute to enhance open communication and better understanding of global migration issues among the wider public? 


Open Methods, Open Data

Virtual Conference using a different platform than the ICA Conference

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Organizers: A/Prof Daniel Angus, Dr Timothy Graham, & Dr Ariadna Matamoros Fernandez (QUT); Dr Tobias Keller (UTZ) 

Contactdaniel.angus@qut.edu.au 

Division/ Interest Group Affiliation: Computational Methods Interest Group 

Description:

We are experiencing a proliferation of new methods in communication studies, in particular those that utilise computation and digital technology. One key facet of this new methodological landscape is the presence of open source technology, workflows and data.

Open source methods and data have a rich history of use within communication research. Given the conference theme of Open Communication we see this pre-conference as the perfect opportunity to tackle the many facets of the open-source movement and its role in communication research.

This pre-conference is organised around practical instruction, panel discussions, technology demonstrations, and plenary talks from leaders and trailblazers in the open-source communication methods/data domain. We will seek to facilitate formal instruction in the use of open source techniques such as open source software and versioning systems, discuss how to manage and make use of open data, and how to develop good practices with regard to reporting methods in an open manner.

We are interested in developing a series of vibrant interactive sessions over this one-day event, and therefore seek interest from those who may wish to contribute to this pre-conference via an open call-for-papers. We encourage those wishing to contribute overviews or instruction on open source communication projects, discussions on contemporary issues in open source such as open academic publishing, and counter points to consider within the discourse of open source, to submit via this call. Note that these do need not be your own original methodological or data collections, and we encourage contributions that detail existing and popular tools and datasets.

This pre-conference will be of interest to a broad range of scholars interested in engaging with, or expanding their skills in open-source communication methods and scholarship. The objective of the pre-conference is to also raise the profile of open-source communication scholarship, to model best-practice initiatives, and build consensus amongst our community on how to continue to grow and develop the open-source communication domain.


Social Media, Algorithms, News, and Public Engagements in the Asia-Pacific and Beyond

ICA Virtual Conference Platform with vFairs

20 May - 26 May

Call for papers


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OrganizersCollege of Media and International Culture, Zhejiang U Department of Communication Arts, U of Wisconsin-Madison The Annenberg School for Communication, U of Pennsylvania

Contactzhongdangpan@wisc.edu

Division/Interest Group Affiliation: Communication & Technology Division|Global Communication and Social Change Division|Information Systems Division|Journalism Studies Division|Mass Communication Division|Political Communication Division

Description:  Two sets of technological advances—the advent of social media and the proliferation of algorithms—are now shaping not only how information in a society is gathered, disseminated, received, and utilized, but also how we understand facts, factuality, and truths, how we are related to one another in public and as publics, and how we devise and engage in civic activities. What technology-driven innovations are emerging in the production and circulation of news? How are platforms affecting the circulation and composition of public information, including news? How might these technology-based changes be contributing to the rise of the discourse of “post-truth” and the emergence of varieties of publics? How are technological advances utilized to combat “fake news” and its dissemination? How are they deployed to innovate civic practices, ranging from the everyday to contentious engagements? In the midst of all the changes and challenges, how may we understand the challenges and possibilities of the familiar models of publics in democratic theories, namely publics who are expected to be informed, participatory, deliberative, and/or empowered?This pre-conference invites submissions of extended paper and panel proposals that examine various aspects of social media and algorithms in connection to the changing practices in news production and circulation as well as in public engagements. We hope to focus in particular on the Asia-Pacific region, but will also welcome studies of other world regions. Possible paper topics may include, but are not limited to, the following:• News and news making on social media platforms• Algorithmic curation of news and fragmentation of the public• Automated journalism in reporting contentious debates and/or protests• Using social media in producing news for civic engagement• Application of data science in news curation for social media• Visualizing data in news reporting of public issues and debates• Contestation over objectivity, factuality, and the cultural authority of journalism• Algorithmic curation and the creation of echo chambers• Algorithmically curated information environments and the rises of nativism, xenophobic nationalism, authoritarianism• AI and social media in fact checking• AI-assisted or AI-enabled authoritarian demagoguery• Social media, AI, and counter-cultural practices• Social media and innovations in collective action  


 

Opportunities, Tensions, and Challenges of Global Higher Education

ICA Virtual Conference Platform with vFairs

20 May - 26 May

Program


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Contactmmitchel@bond.edu.au

Division/Interest Group AffiliationInstructional and Developmental Communication Division

DescriptionGlobal higher education has welcomed international students to study overseas and provided fertile ground for the burgeoning of international campuses and other forms of culturally hybrid institutions. These changes open the quest for new pedagogies able to effectively combine Western, in particular Anglo-Saxon, pedagogical traditions with the expectations and sensitivities of students from Asia. The main objective of the pre/conference is to offer a forum of discussion about the future of global higher education.


Visual Representation and Marginality: Opening New Conversations

Contact Organizer for More Details

21 May; 9:00 - 17:00

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers*Dr T.J. Thomson, Queensland U of Technology, Brisbane, Australia

Contacttj.thomson@qut.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s)Activism, Communication and Social Justice Interest Group|Ethnicity & Race in Communication Division|Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender & Queer Interest Group|Visual Communication Studies Division

Description

In 2020, ICA travels to the antipodes in Australia, home of the world’s oldest continuous civilization, and, in doing so, presents a unique opportunity to understand how visual representation at the margins has been understood by different groups, for different purposes, and in different ways over time. The visual representation of marginalized groups has tended to be shaped by dominant groups. Because images are so powerful, memorable and emotionally charged, such representations have historically worked to perpetuate hierarchies, stereotypes and barriers to full participation in the public sphere. De-marginalizing communities, therefore, requires that we investigate the role of visual communication in oppression and liberation. Before pathways can be opened for improved communication, it is necessary to understand the obstacles of the past. In the digital age, participation in the visual public sphere is as critical as ever to the human condition.  The notions of visuality and visibility, too, and the interplay between them, are other key considerations this pre-conference hopes to encourage discussion on, as the struggle for visibility often involves images politics and is inherently connected to marginality, counter-hegemony, resistance, and advocacy. These phenomena can take visual form as images but can also transcend them and manifest more broadly as material culture, performativity, bodily expressions of identity, etc. We conceptualize visual broadly, “from dreams and cognitive theory through gesture and geography, as well as issues concerning visual ethics, visual ecology, representation, visual media in all forms, and visual behavior.”

Full details are available at: https://forms.gle/z1kPHgMezcHvSyZG9

Journalism, Aid and Development in the Global South

OFF-SITEG14 1.13B ,Griffith U (Gold Coast Campus)

21 May; 8:30 - 17:00

There will not be a call for papers.


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

OrganizersDr Mel Bunce (City, U of London) and Dr David Nolan (U  of Melbourne)

Contactmelanie.bunce.1@city.ac.uk; d.nolan@unimelb.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Global Communication and Social Change Division

Description:

This one day pre-conference brings together researchers and practitioners to critically examine aid and journalism in the Global South. Specifically, it looks at the governments, philanthropists and charitable groups that fund journalism about development and humanitarian issues. 

The day includes keynotes from invited speakers in research, journalism and media-funding. It also includes interactive workshop sessions, in which all attendees are welcome to contribute. These sessions examine the impact of aid on global news content, and consider potential avenues for supporting and improving future coverage.

Registration is $30 US, which covers lunch and refreshments. The number of attendees will be capped to allow time for interaction and conversation.

We will send further details of lineup and speakers in the coming months to registered attendees.



Visual Politics: Image Production, Perception, and Influence

Virtual Conference using Zoom

21 May; 9:00 - 16:00

Call for Papers


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OrganizersErik Bucy (Texas Tech, USA), Cristian Vaccari (Loughborough, UK)

Contact:  erik.bucy@ttu.edu, c.vaccari@lboro.ac.uk

Division/Interest Group AffiliationPolitical Communication Division|Visual Communication Studies Division

Description:Images are ubiquitous in contemporary politics. From television coverage of campaigns and elections to visual memes and images of leaders circulated on social media, visual portrayals shape perceptions of the political world. As efficient carriers of social and symbolic information, they are quickly assessed, rapidly judged, and readily remembered—even when manipulated or released as deepfakes. Despite growing evidence of influence, visuals remain understudied within media politics. This preconference brings together visual scholars from different research traditions and international perspectives to present state of the art studies of image production, perception, and influence in the contemporary political landscape.



POSTCONFERENCES


Digital Platform Regulation: Beyond Transparency and Openness

Virtual Conference using ICA main conference platform

20 May - 26 May

Call for Papers


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Attendees are responsible for their own transportation.

Organizers: Terry Flew

Contactt.flew@qut.edu.au

Division/Interest Group Affiliation(s): Communication Law & Policy Division|Media Industry Studies Interest Group

Description: As online activities and experiences are increasingly mediated through digital platforms, a series of scandals and ‘public shocks’ (Ananny & Gillespie, 2017) have raised concerns about privacy and security, the misuse of user data, algorithmic biases, and the public distribution of objectionable and sometimes abhorrent content through the internet (Flew, Martin, & Suzor, 2019). Legislators and regulators in many countries are now engaged in public enquiries and the development of new laws to apply public interest standards to digital platforms, as First Amendment arguments about freedom of online expression and claims that the platforms are simply intermediaries are increasingly under challenge (Napoli, 2019). Leading scholars have identified digital platforms as being central to 21st century communication and media policy (Just & Puppis, 2018; Picard & Pickard, 2017), and debates about the relationship between individual rights and social responsibilities for digital platforms have been noticeably shifting from the quasi-libertarian logics of only a decade ago (Gillespie, 2018).At the same time, there is a lack of consensus about what digital platform regulation could, or should involve. It is unclear, for instance, whether it should involve a refining of existing forms of communications and media policy to incorporate the role now played by digital platforms as quasi-publishers of increasingly popular digital media content, or whether the principal issues such as monopoly power and consumer protection are best addressed by variants of economic policy e.g. proposals to treat digital platforms as ‘information fiduciaries’ in their handling of user data (Balkin, 2018; Dobkin, 2018). The balance between nation-state regulation and supranational governance is also a subject of considerable debate, as is the extent to which ‘soft law’, and platform-brokered arrangements such as the Twitter Trust & Safety Council and the proposed Facebook Oversight board may substitute for nation-state regulation. At a time of growing tensions among leading world powers, the divergence between forms of internet governance, and the possibility of a global ‘splinternet’ also needs to be considered (Mueller, 2017).This proposed ICA post-conference will bring together academics, activists and policy-makers from a number of countries. Among those who have indicated a willingness to participate are Kristyna Rozgonyi (U. Vienna), Amanda Lotz (QUT), Victor Pickard (Annenberg U. Penn), Dwayne Winseck (Carleton U.), David Hesmondhalgh (U. Leeds), Josef Trappel (U. Salzburg), Sandra Braman (TAMU), Ramon Lobato (RMIT), Sora Park (U. Cambera), and Stuart Cunningham (QUT).The event will be supported by the Australian Research Council, QUT Digital Media Research Centre, Griffith Unviersity Centre for Social and Cultural Research, Communications Law & Policy Division of the ICA, Media Industries Interest Group of the ICA.In addition to academic presentations, we are looking to convene a lunch-time policy-makers forum, with representatives of the Australian Communication and Media Authority (ACMA), Deaprtment of Communcition and the Arts, the Office of the eSafety Commissioner, and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC).Publication outcomes are under consideration including a special issue of the journal Global Perspectves on “Trust in the Digital Economy”, to be edited by Terry Flew and Sora Park.